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Flip Charts

All About Rocks Flip Chart Set

Earth Science - Middle School

 
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\|xiFFIFGy00521rzu Copyright © NewPath Learning. All rights reserved. www.newpathlearning.com 34-6822 Rocks Rocks Charts Charts Sturdy, Free-Standing Design, Perfect for Learning Centers! Reverse Side Features Questions, Labeling Exercises, Vocabulary Review & more!
Phone: 800-507-0966 Fax: 800-507-0967 www.newpathlearning.com NewPath Learning® products are developed by teachers using research-based principles and are classroom tested. The company’s product line consists of an array of proprietary curriculum review games, workbooks, posters and other print materials. All products are supplemented with web-based activities, assessments and content to provide an engaging means of educating students on key, curriculum-based topics correlated to applicable state and national education standards. Copyright © 2014 NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Curriculum Mastery® and NewPath Learning® are registered trademarks of NewPath Learning LLC. Science Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts provide comprehensive coverage of key standards-based curriculum in an illustrated format that is visually appealing, engaging and easy to use. Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts can be used with the entire classroom, with small groups or by students working independently. Each Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart Set features 10 double-sided laminated charts covering grade-level specific curriculum content on one side plus write-on/wipe-off charts on reverse side for student use or for small-group instruction. Built-in sturdy free-standing easel for easy display Spiral bound for ease of use Student Activity Guide Ideal for Learning centers In class instruction for interactive presentations and demonstrations Hands-on student use Stand alone reference for review of key science concepts Teaching resource to supplement any program HOW TO USE Classroom Use Each Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart can be used to graphically introduce or review a topic of interest. Side 1 of each Flip Chart provides graphical representation of key concepts in a concise, grade appropriate reading level for instructing students. The reverse Side 2 of each Flip Chart allows teachers or students to summarize key concepts and assess their understanding. Note: Be sure to use an appropriate dry-erase marker and to test it on a small section of the chart prior to using it. The Activity Guide included provides a black-line master of each Flip Chart which students can use to fill in before, during, or after instruction. While the activities in the guide can be used in conjunction with the Flip Charts, they can also be used individually for review or as a form of assessment or in conjunction with any other related assignment. Learning Centers Each Flip Chart provides students with a quick illustrated view of science curriculum concepts. Students may use these Flip Charts in small group settings along with the corresponding activity pages contained in the guide to learn or review concepts already covered in class. Students may also use these charts as reference while playing the NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Independent student use Students can use the hands-on Flip Charts to practice and learn independently by first studying Side 1 of the chart and then using Side 2 of the chart or the corresponding graphical activities contained in the Activity Guide. Reference/Teaching resource Curriculum Mastery® Charts are a great visual supplement to any curriculum or they can be used in conjunction with NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Chart # 1: Chart # 2: Chart # 3: Chart # 4: Chart # 5: Chart # 6: Chart # 7: Chart # 8: Chart # 9: Chart #10: What is a Rock? Classifying Rocks Igneous Rocks Magma, Lava & Igneous Rock Sedimentary Rocks Metamorphic Rocks The Rock Cycle Identifying Rocks Uses of Rocks & Minerals Vocabulary
What is a Rock? Coal made from the remains of living organisms A rock is not a mineral. It is composed of one or more minerals and sometimes contains organic material. Coal is considered a rock. What is the difference between rocks and minerals? A mineral, by definition, must meet four criteria. It must be a naturally occurring, solid substance that has an internal crystal structure and is formed by inorganic processes. Rocks are made up of minerals. How Do Minerals Form? Minerals form in a variety of geologic environments. Some form as a result of intense heat and pressure created during metamorphism. Some minerals form from hot-water solutions created when ground water is heated by magma. Other minerals form from liquid rock as it cools. Yet another group of minerals form as ocean water evaporates. Minerals 1 - naturally occurring 2 - inorganic (nonliving) 3 - solid substance 4 - crystal structure Rocks are solid, naturally occurring substances composed of one or more minerals and other matter. Rocks are classified into three groups according to how they were formed. Igneous rocks form when liquid rock cools and hardens. Liquid rock that is under the crust is called magma. When it pours out onto the Earth’s surface, it is then called lava. Metamorphic rocks are rocks that have changed as the result of intense heat and pressure deep in the Earth’s crust. Sedimentary rocks are rocks that have been placed in layers by weathering or erosion. Over millions of years, these layers are compressed and cemented together. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4669 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources.
classified into Pause and Review Complete the concept map to illustrate the difference between rocks and minerals. What are they made of? How are they formed? © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4669 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. What is a Rock? Rocks Minerals must meet four criteria are made of
Classifying Rocks sandstone (sedimentary) gneiss (metamorphic, foliated) quartzite (metamorphic, nonfoliated) granite (igneous) shale (sedimentary) slate (metamorphic, foliated) Heat & Pr essure © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4670 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Sedimentary conglomerate limestone Rocks are solid, naturally occurring substances composed of one or more minerals and other matter. Rocks are classified into three groups according to how they were formed: igneous, sedimentary or metamorphic. Sedimentary Rock Formation Sedimentary rocks form from weathering, erosion and layering of sediment that takes place over millions of years. Metamorphic Rock Formation Rocks that changed due to intense heat or pressure in the Earth’s crust are called metamorphic rocks. Metamorphic rocks are further classified as foliated and nonfoliated. basalt pumice granite obsidian limestone sandstone conglomerate Igneous Rock Formation Igneous rocks form when liquid rock cools and hardens. Liquid rock that is under the crust is called magma. When it pours out onto the Earth’s surface, it is then called lava. Pressure Heat
Pause and Review Sort the rocks into the correct category. Draw a line from each rock to the heading. Classifying Rocks © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4670 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. granite slate limestone conglomerate sandstone basalt obsidian pumice quartzite gneiss Igneous Rocks Metamorphic Rocks Sedimentary Rocks
Igneous Rocks © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4671 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. magma lava Formation of Igneous Rock Igneous rocks form from cooling magma and lava. They are classified according to their mineral origin, texture and composition. The origin of igneous rocks is either intrusive or extrusive. Cooling magma below the Earth’s surface forms intrusive rocks, while erupting lava forms extrusive igneous rocks. Classifying Igneous Rocks The texture of an igneous rock is related to how long it takes to cool. Slow-cooling rock forms more crystals and is coarse-grained, while fast-cooling rock has fine grain. Intrusive Extrusive basalt pumice granite magma chamber magma obsidian Extrusive Intrusive Dark igneous rocks, referred to as mafic, have high concentrations of calcium, iron and magnesium. Light igneous rocks are described as felsic, and they have high concentrations of silica, aluminum and potassium. Basalt is a dark igneous rock with visible crystals. It is the most common extrusive rock, forming most of the ocean’s crust. Obsidian is a dark, glassy, extrusive igneous rock. It cools so quickly that it does not have visible crystals. When lava froths up with gases, a lightweight rock called pumice is formed. It is the only rock that can float on water. Granite is a light colored intrusive igneous rock with visible crystals. It is an abundant rock, found at the core of most mountains. lava quartz silica 50-70 % silica
Pause and Review Describe the composition, texture and origin of these igneous rocks. Igneous Rocks Color Classication Origin Example Mineral Concentrations obsidian basalt granite IGNEOUS ROCKS pumice © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4671 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources.
incr easing heat & pr essur e crust mantle magma liquid rock gases water granite basalt pumice obsidian crust magma lava Magma Magma is a mixture of liquid rock, gases and water formed from intense heat and pressure in the Earth’s mantle. Not all magma is the same. The composition and viscosity of magma can vary. These properties affect how fast the lava flows and the type of volcano that forms. Viscosity is a liquid's resistance to flow. High viscosity magma is sticky and flows very slowly. Low viscosity magma flows more quickly. Higher temperatures make magma and lava more fluid, lowering the viscosity. Pahoehoe is a type of very hot, fast-moving lava with low viscosity. Slower-moving, cooler, high-viscosity lava is known as aa. Different Types of Lava Magma with high silica content has a higher viscosity and produces light-colored lava that later forms rhyolite. Magma with less silica and a lower viscosity produces dark lava that forms basalt. aa - high viscosity pahoehoe - low viscosity Magma, Lava & Igneous Ro ck Mt. Saint Helen’s © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4672 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Photos courtesy of USGS. What Is a Volcano? A volcano forms when magma moves through the crust and erupts onto the surface of the Earth. Magma that flows onto the Earth's surface is called lava. Layers of cooled lava harden into igneous rock and build up on the Earth's surface around a volcano. Igneous rock also forms when magma cools and hardens under the Earth’s crust.
incr easing heat & pr essur e liquid rock gases water Pause and Review Label the images below. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4672 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Magma, Lava & Igneous Ro ck
Sedimentary Rocks © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4673 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Classifying Sedimentary Rocks Sedimentary rocks form in layers, or strata, that have been deposited and cemented together over millions of years. There are three categories of sedimentary rock—clastic, organic and chemical. Clastic sedimentary rocks are made of pieces of pre-existing rocks that are transported by wind and water and deposited in a new location. Layers of sediment accumulate and become cemented together to form solid rock. Sandstone, shale and conglomerate are examples of clastic sedimentary rocks. erosion pressure deposition compaction cementation shale sandstone conglomerate fossilized limestone coquina (limestone) Organic sedimentary rocks form when shell remains fossilize and become a layer of limestone on the ocean floor. A coral reef is an example of organic limestone formed from the buildup of coral skeletons. Chemical sedimentary rocks form through precipitation or crystallization of dissolved minerals. Dissolved calcite forms fine- grained limestone that shows no fossilized remains. Limestone is primarily used for concrete and road construction. Coal is a type of organic sedimentary rock that is used as a solid fuel to produce electricity and heat. coal limestone
Pause and Review Compare and contrast the three types of sedimentary rock. Sedimentary Rocks SEDIMENTARY ROCKS clastic chemical organic CategoryOrigin & Description Example © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4673 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources.
Metamorphic Rocks © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4674 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Formation of Metamorphic Rocks Metamorphic rocks are formed from any type of rock that changes as a result of intense heat and pressure in the Earth’s crust. For example, as sedimentary shale is exposed to more heat and pressure, it changes into different types of metamorphic rocks. slate schist gneiss schist phyllite gneiss shale P H contact metamorphosis magma sedimentary rock contact metamorphosis regional metamorphosis contact metamorphosis magma sedimentary rock contact metamorphosis regional metamorphosis Contact metamorphism occurs when rocks come in contact with magma. Regional metamorphism occurs when intense pressure, such as mountain formation, changes large-scale areas of rocks. Classifying Metamorphic Rocks Metamorphic rocks are classified as foliated or nonfoliated. The texture of nonfoliated metamorphic rocks is not arranged in bands. Examples include marble, that is formed from limestone, and quartzite, that begins as sandstone. Foliated metamorphic rock - arranged in layers foliated metamorphic rock slate gneiss bands marble quartzite limestone sandstone Heat & Pressure Foliated rocks, like slate and gneiss, have grains arranged in thin parallel layers or bands.
Pause and Review Complete the concept map below. Metamorphic Rocks © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4674 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. form by are classified as examples examples Metamorphic Rocks have grains have grains
The Rock Cycle Under intense heat and pressure, any type of rock can be transformed into metamorphic rock. All types of rock can be weathered, transported and cemented into layers to become sedimentary rock. The Earth is a dynamic planet, and its rocks are constantly changing. The rock cycle shows how different natural processes transform rocks from one rock type to another. When metamorphic rock is heated to its melting point and then cooled, it becomes igneous rock. PRESSURE HEAT PRESSURE HEAT © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4675 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. weathering & er osion deposition compaction
Pause and Review Fill in the parts of the rock cycle using the following terms: Sedimentary rock, Metamorphic rock, Igneous rock, Melting, Heat & Pr essure, Cooling & Crystalization, Weathering & Erosion The Rock Cycle Volcanic Activity Uplift Magma Compaction (Cementation) Transportation & De position © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4675 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources.
Identifying Rocks Rocks are solid, naturally occurring substances composed of one or more minerals and other matter. Rocks are classified into three groups according to how they were formed: igneous, metamorphic or sedimentary. COLOR: reddish brown with some gray DESCRIPTION: large random crystals and no layers GRAIN: large, coarse grains or clasts (easily visible to the eye) COMPOSITION: Some minerals found in this rock are quartz, feldspar and mica. Geologists use physical properties and characteristics of rocks to help identify them. Some of the properties of the sedimentary rock breccia are described below. This rock is formed when eroded rock fragments pile up and are compacted together. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4676 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Some photos courtesy of USGS and NPS. Igneous Rocks Sedimentary Rocks Metamorphic Rocks Igneous rocks form when liquid rock (magma & lava) cools and hardens. Igneous rocks may or may not have visible crystals depending on how long they took to cool. Sometimes lava is frothed up with gases, producing a very light weight rock called pumice. pumice obsidian granite basalt Metamorphic rocks are rocks that have changed as the result of intense heat and pressure deep in the Earth’s crust. Foliated metamorphic rocks have mineral grains arranged in parallel layers Nonfoliated metamorphic rocks have mineral grains arranged randomly. sandstone conglomerate limestone shale gneiss quartzite marble slate Sedimentary rocks are rocks that have been placed by weathering or erosion in layers. Over millions of years, these layers are compressed and cemented together. There are three categories of sedimentary rocks: clastic, chemical and biochemical or organic.
Identifying Rocks Pause and Review Describe and identify the following rock samples. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4676 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Color: ___________________________________ Grain: ___________________________________ Description: ______________________________ Composition: _____________________________ Type: ____________________________________ Name of rock: ____________________________ Color: ___________________________________ Grain: ___________________________________ Description: ______________________________ Composition: _____________________________ Type: ____________________________________ Name of rock: ____________________________ Color: ___________________________________ Grain: ___________________________________ Description: ______________________________ Composition: _____________________________ Type: ____________________________________ Name of rock: ____________________________ Color: ___________________________________ Grain: ___________________________________ Description: ______________________________ Composition: _____________________________ Type: ____________________________________ Name of rock: ____________________________ Color: ___________________________________ Grain: ___________________________________ Description: ______________________________ Composition: _____________________________ Type: ____________________________________ Name of rock: ____________________________ Color: ___________________________________ Grain: ___________________________________ Description: ______________________________ Composition: _____________________________ Type: ____________________________________ Name of rock: ____________________________
Uses of Rocks & Minerals Uses of Igneous Rocks Igneous rocks have a variety of uses. Pumice is used as an abrasive, and porcelain is made from minerals found in granite. Many others are used in the building industry. TOOTH Whitener basalt pumice granite Uses of Metamorphic Rocks Metamorphic rocks are used primarily for construction purposes. Marble is used for decorative statues, columns and flooring. Slate is used for roofing and walkways. Uses of Sedimentary Rocks Limestone is primarily used for concrete and road construction. Coal is a type of organic sedimentary rock that is used as a solid fuel to produce electricity and heat. limestone marble coal slate © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4677 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Some photos courtesy of USGS.
Pause and Review Choose from this list of rocks and match each to its use: sandstone, pumice, quartzite, granite, marble, basalt, coal, limestone, slate . Uses of Rocks & Minerals TOOTH Whitene r abrasive cleanser counter-top pavement roong concrete/cement statues/building building stones energy stairs/oors © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4677 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources.
Key Vocabulary Terms © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4678 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. chemical sedimentary rock sedimentary rock formed by the chemical precipitation of mineral material from ocean water (such as gypsum, limestone and halite) deposition compaction & cementation wind & water clastic sedimentary rock sedimentary rock composed of fragments of other rock magma contact metamorphism metamorphism of rock from intense heat when it comes in contact with magma or is in close proximity extrusive igneous rock that comes out onto the Earth’s surface and hardens felsic a description of light colored, silica-rich igneous rocks foliated rock metamorphic rock characterized by layered mineralization Igneous granite pumice obsidian basalt igneous rock rocks that form by the cooling of liquid rock (magma or lava) intrusive igneous rock that is trapped and hardens under the Earth’s crust mafic a description of very dark, iron and magnesium-rich igneous rocks metamorphic rock rock that has changed form due to intense heat and pressure nonfoliated rock metamorphic rock characterized by randomly interlocking crystals or grains organic sedimentary sedimentary rock formed by the accumulation of shell material on the ocean floor regional metamorphism metamorphism of rock by intense pressure such as mountain formation erosion pressure deposition compaction cementation sedimentary rocks formed by the processes of weathering and erosion, transportation, deposition and cementation obsidian obsidian gabbro basalt granite granite feldspar rhyolite basalt marble quartzite granite basalt obsidian pumice
Key Vocabulary Terms Mapping a Term Define it! Use it in a sentence! Draw it! Provide examples! ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4678 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Term __________________________________________________________
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