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Flip Charts

All About Volcanoes Flip Chart Set

Earth Science - Middle School

 
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\|xiFFIFGy00524sz\ Copyright © NewPath Learning. All rights reserved. www.newpathlearning.com 34-6825 VolcanoeS VolcanoeS Charts Charts Sturdy, Free-Standing Design, Perfect for Learning Centers! Reverse Side Features Questions, Labeling Exercises, Vocabulary Review & more!
Phone: 800-507-0966 Fax: 800-507-0967 www.newpathlearning.com NewPath Learning® products are developed by teachers using research-based principles and are classroom tested. The company’s product line consists of an array of proprietary curriculum review games, workbooks, posters and other print materials. All products are supplemented with web-based activities, assessments and content to provide an engaging means of educating students on key, curriculum-based topics correlated to applicable state and national education standards. Copyright © 2014 NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Curriculum Mastery® and NewPath Learning® are registered trademarks of NewPath Learning LLC. Science Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts provide comprehensive coverage of key standards-based curriculum in an illustrated format that is visually appealing, engaging and easy to use. Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts can be used with the entire classroom, with small groups or by students working independently. Each Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart Set features 10 double-sided laminated charts covering grade-level specific curriculum content on one side plus write-on/wipe-off charts on reverse side for student use or for small-group instruction. Built-in sturdy free-standing easel for easy display Spiral bound for ease of use Student Activity Guide Ideal for Learning centers In class instruction for interactive presentations and demonstrations Hands-on student use Stand alone reference for review of key science concepts Teaching resource to supplement any program HOW TO USE Classroom Use Each Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart can be used to graphically introduce or review a topic of interest. Side 1 of each Flip Chart provides graphical representation of key concepts in a concise, grade appropriate reading level for instructing students. The reverse Side 2 of each Flip Chart allows teachers or students to summarize key concepts and assess their understanding. Note: Be sure to use an appropriate dry-erase marker and to test it on a small section of the chart prior to using it. The Activity Guide included provides a black-line master of each Flip Chart which students can use to fill in before, during, or after instruction. While the activities in the guide can be used in conjunction with the Flip Charts, they can also be used individually for review or as a form of assessment or in conjunction with any other related assignment. Learning Centers Each Flip Chart provides students with a quick illustrated view of science curriculum concepts. Students may use these Flip Charts in small group settings along with the corresponding activity pages contained in the guide to learn or review concepts already covered in class. Students may also use these charts as reference while playing the NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Independent student use Students can use the hands-on Flip Charts to practice and learn independently by first studying Side 1 of the chart and then using Side 2 of the chart or the corresponding graphical activities contained in the Activity Guide. Reference/Teaching resource Curriculum Mastery® Charts are a great visual supplement to any curriculum or they can be used in conjunction with NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Chart # 1: Chart # 2: Chart # 3: Chart # 4: Chart # 5: Chart # 6: Chart # 7: Chart # 8: Chart # 9: Chart #10: What is a Volcano? Volcanoes & Plate Boundaries The Ring of Fire Properties of Magma Inside a Volcano Volcanic Eruptions Volcanic Classification Life Cycle of a Volcano Volcanic Landforms, Hot Springs & Geysers Vocabulary
Magma Formation Magma is a mixture of liquid rock, gases and water formed from intense heat and pressure in the Earth's mantle. incr easing heat & pr essur e crust mantle magma liquid rock gases water What Is a Volcano? A volcano forms when magma moves through the crust and erupts onto the surface of the Earth. Magma that flows onto the Earth's surface is called lava . Layers of cooled lava harden into rock and build up on the Earth's surface around a volcano. crust magma reservoir lava pipe side vent vent What is a Volcano? Mt. Saint Helen’s © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4532 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Photos courtesy of USGS & NOAA. magma
incr easing heat & pr essur e liquid rock gases water Pause and Review Label the images below. What is a Volcano? © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4532 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources.
Tectonic Plate Boundaries Most of the Earth's volcanoes are located at tectonic plate boundaries. These volcanoes are found on both continental and oceanic crust. Volcanoes at Divergent Boundaries Mid-ocean ridges form from lava pouring onto the ocean floor at divergent plate boundaries. mid-ocean ridge magma ocean oor old crust old crust new crust new crust erupting magma (lava) rift valley Divergent boundary volcano chain On land, divergent boundaries produce chains of active volcanoes. Volcanoes at Convergent Boundaries At convergent boundaries, oceanic plates are subducted and magma forms from melting crust. Eruptions create volcanic island arcs in the ocean and volcanic mountain ranges on land. trench volcano continental plate oceanic plate mantle magma Subduction zone Convergent boundary Hot Spot Volcanoes Some volcanoes form over hot spots that are not located along plate boundaries. A hot spot occurs when rising magma is close to the Earth's surface. The islands of Hawaii were formed over a hot spot in the Pacific Ocean. Eurasian Plate North American Plate Eurasian Plate Arabian Plate African Plate South American Plate Pacific Plate Indian Plate Australian Plate Antarctic Plate Nazca Plate Cocos Plate Pacific Ocean volcanic islands volcanic arc on land Volcanoes & Plat e Boundaries © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4533 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Photos courtesy of USGS & NASA. Eurasian Plate North American Plate Eurasian Plate Arabian Plate African Plate South American Plate Pacific Plate Indian Plate Australian Plate Antarctic Plate Nazca Plate Cocos Plate Pacific Ocean plate boundary
Pause and Review Create a concept map of the different types of plate boundaries and the kinds of volcanoes associated with them. Volcanoes & Plat e Boundaries © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4533 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources.
Eurasian Plate North American Plate Eurasian Plate Arabian Plate African Plate South American Plate Pacific Plate Indian Plate Australian Plate Antarctic Plate Nazca Plate Cocos Plate Pacific Ocean plate boundary hot spot Ring of Fire The belt of volcanoes along the boundary of the Pacific Ocean is called the Ring of Fire because it contains about 75% of the world’s active volcanoes. The Ring of Fire Mt. Pinatubo, Philippines Mt. Redoubt, Alaska Mt. St. Helens, Washington Krakatoa, Indonesia Nevado de Ruiz, Columbia Mt. Ruapehu, New Zealand Ring of Fire Volcanoes © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4534 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Some photos courtesy of USGS & NASA.
Pause and Review Research volcanoes located in the Ring of Fire. Find images. Display your findings below. The Ring of Fire © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4534 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources.
Lava Color Viscosity Speed of Flow Rock Formed Silica Content high high slow light rhyolite low low fast dark basalt Magma Types Magma Properties Can Vary Not all magma is the same. The composition and viscosity of magma can vary. These properties affect how fast the lava flows and the type of volcano that forms. Although magma is a complex mixture, it is primarily composed of silica. Magma can contain from 50 to 70 percent silica. aa - high viscosity pahoehoe - low viscosity Magma Viscosity Viscosity is a liquid's resistance to flow. High viscosity magma is sticky and flows very slowly. Low viscosity magma flows more quickly. Temperature Affects Magma & Lava Higher temperatures make magma and lava more fluid, lowering the viscosity. Pahoehoe is a type of very hot, fast-moving lava with low viscosity. Slower- moving, cooler, high-viscosity lava is known as aa. quartz silica 50-70 % silica quartz silica 50-70 % silica 0 1400 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 1100 1200 1300 temper atur e viscosit y Different Types of Lava Magma with high silica content has a higher viscosity and produces light-colored lava that later forms rhyolite. Magma with less silica and a lower viscosity produces dark lava that forms basalt. Properties of Magma © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4535 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Some photos courtesy of USGS.
Pause and Review Complete the concept map for the properties of magma. Fill in the chart below. Properties of Magma © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4535 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. is and flows is and flows MAGMA viscosity types is composed of Lava Color Viscosity Speed of Flow Rock Formed Silica Content high low Magma Types
Inside a Volcano Beneath the surface of a volcano is a magma reservoir where rock that is exposed to heat and pressure changes into magma. A long tube through the crust called a pipe connects the reservoir to the surface. pipe vent crater crust magma reservoir lava side vent Vents and Craters Lava flows out onto the surface through an opening called a vent. Some volcanoes form smaller side vents where lava and gases escape. A cone- shaped depression called a crater often forms during explosive eruptions. magma pressure from surrounding rock pressure from expanding gases Why Does a Volcano Erupt? When magma rises toward the surface, gas bubbles expand and increase in pressure. The force of the gas pushes the magma out of the vent and causes an eruption. Inside a Volcano © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4536 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Photos courtesy of USGS. magma reservoir
Pause and Review Label the volcano. Describe what happens inside a volcano that causes it to erupt. _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ Inside a Volcano © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4536 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources.
Types of Eruptions There are two types of eruptions—quiet and explosive. Quiet eruptions are non-explosive and occur in volcanoes with low-viscosity, low-silica magma. The fast-moving lava flows out of the vent and across the surface of the land. Explosive eruptions occur in volcanoes with thick, high- viscosity magma that is high in silica. Magma builds up within the volcano's pipe rather than flowing out. Pressure increases until an explosive eruption occurs. magma lava ow vents Volcanic Material & Rocks Volcanic material can be found in all different sizes from tiny ash particles, to cinders, to large pieces called volcanic bombs. Pyroclastic Flow and Lahar Explosive eruptions release a mixture called a pyroclastic flow made up of hot ash, rocks and gases. A fast-moving mudflow called a lahar can also form during an explosive eruption. Obsidian, pumice, basalt, and rhyolite are all igneous rocks that form from volcanic eruptions. pyroclastic flow lahar obsidian pumice pumice magma reservoir lava vents lava flow cinders volcanic bombs basalt rhyolite Volcanic Eruptions © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4537 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Photos courtesy of USGS & NOAA.
Pause and Review Identify and describe the two types of eruptions volcanoes may have. Volcanic Eruptions Type: _______________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ Type: _______________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4537 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources.
Volcanoes are classified by their shape. There are three types of volcanoes—composite, shield and cinder cone. Composite Volcano A composite volcano forms from alternating layers of ash and layers of flowing lava. Composite volcanoes have steep sides and may have a crater on top. This is the most common type of volcano. composite shield cinder cone shield cinder cone shield cinder cone Cinder Cone Volcano A cinder cone is a small, steep volcano that is created from the accumulation of ash and pyroclastic material. They often have a crater where the top of the volcano was blown off during an explosive eruption. Shield Volcano Shield volcanoes are wide, flat volcanoes formed by non-explosive lava flows. Layers of hardened lava result in a gently sloping mountain. The Hawaiian Islands were formed from shield volcanoes. crater lava flows Volcanic Classification © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4538 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Photos courtesy of USGS.
Pause and Review Label and describe the different types of volcanoes. How does each form? Volcanic Classification composite shield cinder cone cinder cone shield cinder cone Type of volcano: __________________________ Description: ______________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ _________________________________________ ___________________________________________ Type of volcano: __________________________ Description: ______________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ _________________________________________ ___________________________________________ Type of volcano: __________________________ Description: ______________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4538 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources.
Stages of Activity Volcanoes have different stages of activity. An active volcano is one that is erupting or showing signs of erupting soon. A dormant volcano has not erupted for a while, but is expected to erupt in the future. An extinct volcano will probably never erupt again. Monitoring Volcanoes Geologists use a variety of technical instruments to study volcanoes and predict eruptions. Earthquakes, increases in ground temperature and escaped gases provide warning signals of potential eruption. clouds of ash & gases lava flows fires Destruction Caused by Volcanoes Volcanoes can cause widespread damage. Huge clouds of ash may bury towns, and volcanic gases can be deadly. A lava flow covers everything in its path and can start fires and landslides. Active Mount St. Helens, Washington Dormant Mauna Kea, Hawaii Extinct Mount Killimanjaro, Tanzania Warning Signs surfacemovement earthquakes increased temperatures escapedgases Life Cycle of a Volcano © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4539 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Photos courtesy of USGS & NOAA.
Mount St. Helens, Washington Mauna Kea, Hawaii Mount Killimanjaro, Tanzania Pause and Review Name and define each volcano stage of activity. Stage: ___________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ Stage: ___________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ Stage: ___________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ Life Cycle of a Volcano © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4539 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. What warning signs do geologist look for to predict if a volcano will erupt? _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________
Devils Tower, Wyoming Half Dome, Yosemite exposed, hardened magma Devils Tower, Wyoming Half Dome, Yosemite, CA Kilauea Volcano’s summit caldera, HI Caldera After an eruption, the magma reservoir of a volcano may be partially emptied. Some volcanoes collapse into this chamber, forming a large depression on the surface called a caldera. Volcanic Necks & Dome Mountains Volcanic necks are the remnants of a volcanic plug within a previously active volcano. The hardened magma is exposed by weathering and erosion. A dome mountain is magma that hardens below the crust and is uplifted. caldera (lake forms) cinder cone Mount Pinatubo caldera, Phillipines Puu Oo caldera, Hawaii caldera caldera magma chamber partially emptied Hot Springs and Geysers Magma that exists very close to the Earth’s surface can warm the groundwater. Hot springs and geysers are formed when this water emerges on the surface of the Earth. hot springs geyser Old Faithful Some photos courtesy of USGS & NPS. Volcanic Landforms, Hot Springs & Geysers © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4540 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources.
Type of landform: ___________________ Description: ________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ Type of landform: ___________________ Description: ________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ Type of landform: ___________________ Description: ________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ Type of landform: ___________________ Description: ________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ Pause and Review Identify and describe each type of landform. Volcanic Landforms, Hot Springs & Geysers © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4540 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources.
Key Vocabulary Terms © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4541 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. aa lava slow-moving lava that cools with jagged edges; cooler than pahoehoe caldera caldera a large depression on the top of a volcano formed when the volcano collapses into an empty magma reservoir layers of ash crater cinder cone volcano a relatively small volcano formed by the accumulation of ash and pyroclastic material layers of ash & lava lava composite volcano the most common type of volcano; formed by alternating layers of ash and lava flows dome mountain a mountain formed by the uplift of hardened magma below the Earth’s surface geyser heated groundwater that builds up pressure underground and erupts in a fountain of water and steam hot spring heated groundwater that flows onto the Earth’s surface into a natural pool lava liquid (molten) rock that is extruded through the surface of the Earth’s crust crust mantle magma reservoir magma liquid (molten) rock that is under the Earth’s crust pahoehoe lava hot fast-moving lava that cools in a coiled, ropelike form; hotter than aa pipe a long tube through the Earth’s crust that connects a magma reservoir to the surface Eurasian Plate North American Plate Eurasian Plate Arabian Plate African Plate South American Plate Pacific Plate Indian Plate Australian Plate Antarctic Plate Nazca Plate Cocos Plate Pacific Ocean Ring of Fire a large belt of volcanic islands on the boundary of the Pacific Ocean vents lava ow magma shield volcano a wide, flat volcano formed by the non-explosive flow of lava Devils Tower, Wyoming volcanic neck a landform that is created when magma hardens in a volcano’s pipe and is weathered over time caldera crater lava layers of ash layers of ash & lava magma vents lava Some photos courtesy of USGS.
Key Vocabulary Terms Mapping a Term Define it! Use it in a sentence! Draw it! Provide examples! ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 94-4541 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. Term __________________________________________________________
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