Curriculum Resources
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Flip Charts

English Language Arts Grade 2 Flip Chart Set

English Language Arts, Grade 2

 
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Copyright © NewPath Learning. All rights reserved. www.newpathlearning.com Charts Charts \|xiFBGIGy00690pzY 32-2001 Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts Combine Essential ELA Skills with Hands-On Review! Grade Grade 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 C i l t M ® Fli Ch t ra Gr G Gra G G Gr ra ra G Gr Gr r 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 e 2 2 2 e 2 2 2 e e 2 2 2 2 e 2 ade e e 2 2 2 2 e 2 2 e e 2 2 2 2 2 2 ade ade ade 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 Han Curricul Combine with Ha Mastery um Ma L ® e E e Essential EL vie nds-On Revi Flip ip Charts LA Skills LA Skills ew! h Ch C C Ch C Ch C Ch h Ch h h C Ch Ch Ch har har har harts ts ts ts 32-2001 \|xiFBGIGy00690pzY \|xiFBGIGy00690pzY www Copyright © NewPath Learning. .newpathlearning.com www All rights reserved. © Ne ewPath Learning. earning.com hle All rights reserved. .newpathlearning.com Sturdy, Free-Standing Design, Perfect for Learning Centers! Reverse Side Features Questions, Labeling Exercises, Vocabulary Review & more!
ELA Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts provide comprehensive coverage of key standards-based concepts in an illustrated format that is visually appealing, engaging and easy to use. Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts are “write-on/wipe-off” and can be used with the entire classroom, with small groups or by students working independently. This Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart Set features 10 double-sided laminated charts that introduce English Language Arts standards and write-on/wipe off activities for student use or for small group instruction Built-in sturdy free-standing easel for easy display Spiral bound for ease of use Activity Guide with blackline masters of the charts for students to use in centers or independently Ideal for In class instruction for interactive presentations and demonstrations Hands-on student use Teaching resource to supplement any program Learning Centers Stand alone reference for review of key ELA concepts C B A Vowel Digraphs Prefixes Suffixes Contractions Syllables Abbreviations Proper Nouns Verbs Complete & Incomplete Sentences Story Elements Chart # 1: Chart # 2: Chart # 3: Chart # 4: Chart # 5: Chart # 6: Chart # 7: Chart # 8: Chart # 9: Chart #10: HOW TO USE Classroom Use Each ELA Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart can be used for enhancing reading comprehension and language arts instruction. The front page of each Flip Chart provides graphical representation of the topic in a concise, grade appropriate reading level for instructing students. The reverse side of each Flip Chart provides activities for students to practice. Note: Be sure to use an appropriate dry-erase marker and to test it on a small section of the chart prior to using it. The Activity Guide included provides a black-line master of each Flip Chart which students can use to fill in before, during or after instruction. ELA Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts are a great supplement to any ELA program. While the activities in the guide can be used in conjunction with the Flip Charts, they can also be used individually for review or as a form of assessment or in combination with other related classroom activities. Learning Centers Each Flip Chart provides students with a quick illustrated view of grade appropriate language arts concepts. Students may use these Flip Charts in small group settings along with the corresponding activity pages contained in the guide to learn or review concepts already covered in class. Students may also use these charts as reference while playing NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Independent Student Use Students can use the hands-on Flip Charts to practice and learn independently by first studying Side 1 of the chart and then using Side 2 of the chart, or the corresponding graphical activities contained in the guide, to fill in the answers and assess their understanding. Reference/Teaching Resource Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts are a great visual supplement to any curriculum or they can be used in conjunction with NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Phone: 800-507-0966 Fax: 800-507-0967 www.newpathlearning.com NewPath Learning® products are developed by teachers using research-based principles and are classroom tested. The company’s product line consists of an array of proprietary curriculum review games, workbooks, charts, posters, visual learning guides, interactive whiteboard software and other teaching resources. All products are supplemented with web-based activities, assessments and content to provide an engaging means of educating students on key, curriculum-based topics correlated to applicable state and national education standards. Copyright © 2015 NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Curriculum Mastery® and NewPath Learning® are registered trademarks of NewPath Learning LLC. Visit www.newpathlearning.comfor a digital version of this Flip Chart set and other Online Resources.
You know the vowels are a, e, i, o, and u. Did you also know that y is always a vowel except when it’s the first letter of a word? (as in yellow and yard and yip) Vowel digraphs are pairs of vowels. When two vowels go walking, the first one does the talking. It says its name. The second vowel is silent. Some vowel digraphs make a new sound. Long ago, the letter w was actually two of the letter u. It was a double u. Now when w comes after a vowel, it forms a digraph. The letters blend to make a new sound. grain roast wheel toe meal honey mouse daughter screwdriver downstairs fawn Sweet Honey Vowel Digraphs Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4012
Circle the words that are vowel digraphs in which the first vowel says its name. There may be more than one per row. Circle the words that are vowel digraphs in which the vowels blend to make a new sound. There is more than one per row. Vowel Digraphs 1. playpen ground floor foam 2. loop train cheated cruise 3. house monkey powder needle 4. scream caught coat outside 5. fruitcake paint shoe halfway 6. stain brown awesome keep 7. ground gloat doe pause 8. fewer faint towel sleepy 9. donkey flower awful leader 10. author cruel jewel cloak Fred’ s New Sled Illustrated by T. Bear By Lynne Foot Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4012
“No cookies before dinner!” A root word is a word before a prefix or a suffix is added to it. Sometimes root words are called base words. In the word rewrite, the root word is write. The prefix is re. In the word preschool, the root word is school. The prefix is pre. A prefix is a group of letters added to the start of a root word that change its meaning. The prefix re- means to do again. I will reheat this in the microwave. The prefix un- means not. Did she unwrap my gift? The prefix dis- means not. My little brother may disobey my mom. The prefix pre- means before. He pretreated the stain before washing the shirt. The prefix sub- means under. The submarine moved below the sea’s surface. The prefix bi- means two. My grandpa wears bifocal glasses. The prefix tri- means three. Stella’s mom just had triplets! 2:13 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 Prefixes Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4013
Add the prefix to each root word. Write the new word on the line. biped biped = 2 feet tricycle = 3 wheels unusual = not usual pretest = before test 1. bi + ped = ________________ 2. dis + agree = ________________ 3. re + model = ________________ 4. tri + cycle = ________________ 5. sub + urb = ________________ 6. un + usual = ________________ 7. pre + test = ________________ Prefixes Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4013
A root word is a word before a prefix or a suffix is added to it. Sometimes root words are called base words. In the word slower the root word is slow. The suffix is -er. In the word hopeless, the root word is hope. The suffix is -less. A suffix is a group of letters added to the end of a root word that change its meaning. The suffix -s or -es added to a word means more than one. Put the chairs around the table. The suffix -ful means full of. That is a beautiful vase. The suffix -ness means having the quality of. The darkness was complete. The suffix -less means without. My little dog is fearless. The suffix -er means more. Use it to compare two things. Jill can read faster than I can. The suffix -est means most. Use it to compare three or more things. Alberto is the tallest boy in our class. Suffixes Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4014
Add the suffix to each root word. Write the new word on the line. 1. box + es = ________________ 2. cheer + ful = ________________ 3. steep + er = ________________ 4. kind + ness = ________________ 5. help + less = ________________ 6. chipmunk + s = ________________ 7. smooth + est = ________________ Suffixes Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4014
A contraction is one word. It is made by putting together two words. One or more letters are missing from the second word. An apostrophe takes the place of the missing letters. did + not = didn’t Notice that the apostrophe takes the place of the o in not. they + are = they’re An apostrophe takes the place of the a in are. Here are some contractions in which two letters are missing: they + will = they’ll An apostrophe takes the place of the wi in will. you + have = you’ve An apostrophe takes the place of the ha in have. cannot = can’t An apostrophe takes the place of the no. The contraction ’s can stand for has or is. You can tell which it is by the context. It’s been a long time since I’ve seen Donna. (It has been a long time since I’ve seen Donna.) There’s a ship in the port. (There is a ship in the port.) The contraction for will not is strange. It is the only one where the first word changes, too. will + not = won’t Never forget to use the apostrophe. If you do, the contraction may look like a different word, as in: shell instead of she’ll were instead of we’re Ill instead of I’ll Contractions Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4015
Write the contraction for each pair of words. you’re 1. you are = _________________ 2. will not = _________________ 3. I have = _________________ 4. should not = _________________ 5. she is = _________________ 6. cannot = _________________ 7. they are = _________________ 8. he will = _________________ 9. would have = _________________ 10. there has = _________________ 11. you will = _________________ 12. we are = _________________ we are they are you are he will she is Contractions Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4015
Syllables are the parts of a word that have one vowel sound. There may be more than one vowel, but you only hear one sound. There are one-syllable words such as: cave ten sick toast they It is important to know about syllables. When you come to a long word you don’t know, you can break it into syllables. That will help you to decode it. When you read a word, you can figure out how many syllables it has. Tap your finger each time you hear a new vowel sound. How many syllables are in these words? foun-da-tion route force-ful re-cy-cling There are two-syllable words such as: black-bird sleep-ing bot-tle help-ful crys-tal There are three-syllable words such as: ba-nan-a el-e-phant In-ter-net plen-ti-ful mys-ter-y There are four-syllable words such as: grad-u-a-tion ed-u-ca-tion in-ter-esting com-mu-ni-ty 10 F 96 98 100 102 104 106 Soda Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4016 Syllables
How many syllables are in each word? Say each one aloud and tap your finger. 1. blueberry _______ 2. boredom _______ 3. through _______ 4. journal _______ 5. umbrella _______ 6. orange _______ 7. experiment _______ 8. hungry _______ 9. fireworks _______ 10. strength _______ 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 Syllables Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4016
Nine months of the year can be abbreviated. May, June, and July are not abbreviated because they are already short: Jan. for January Aug. for August Feb. for February Sept. for September Mar. for March Oct. for October Apr. for April Nov. for November Dec. for December An abbreviation is a short form of a word. Many abbreviations start with a capital letter and end with a period. Mr. Browning Mrs. Woodley Ms. Jenson Dr. Ortiz (for Mister) (for Missus) (blend of Miss & Mrs.) (for Doctor) The days of the week always drop day in their abbreviations. Wednesday and Saturday drop even more letters: Sun. Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. Sat. Addresses use these abbreviations: St. for Street Rd. for Road Ave. for Avenue Measurement abbreviations do not have capital letters. Weight abbreviations are strange: in. for inches ft. for feet oz. for ounces lb. for pounds 8 oz 4 oz 0 50 100 150 200 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 inch foot Abbreviations Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4017
Write the abbreviation for each underlined word. Use a capital letter and a period if needed. 1. Halloween is on Monday, October 31. _______________ _______________ 2. Mister Sanchez was born in September, 1981. _______________ _______________ 3. The small dog weighs 11 pounds, 3 ounces. _______________ _______________ 4. In April they are moving to a house on States Avenue. _______________ _______________ 5. The Ledbetters are having a party on Saturday, December 31. _______________ _______________ 6. I started going to my new school on Monday, January 7. _______________ _______________ 7. The wall’s height is 16 feet, 4 inches. _______________ _______________ 8. Doctor Townsend’s office is on Mirror Street. _______________ _______________ 9. Did you hear that Waterford Road will reopen on Thursday? _______________ _______________ 10. My birthday is coming up on Wednesday, August 8. _______________ _______________ January SAM Mon. Oct. Abbreviations Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4017
JAN FEB MAR APRIL MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC Phoenix The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain SAM 10 pops Junior Pops Cherry S Sun M Mon T Tue W Wed T Thur F Fri S Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 A proper noun refers to a specific person, place, or thing. A proper noun always has a capital letter. If there are two parts, as in your first and last names, then both words are capitalized. Names of People and Pets Tara Larter Dr. Jack Cooper Mrs. Benedict Buddy Tweety Names of Places and Products Niagara Falls Phoenix, Arizona Junior Pops Chewy Chow Days, Months and Holidays Titles of Books, Magazines, Movies & Songs Sunday–Saturday The Adventures of Tom Sawyer Weekly Reader Beauty and the Beast The Star-Spangled Banner January–December Halloween Easter Proper Nouns Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4018
Find the proper nouns and write them, using correct capitalization, on the line. There may be more than one per sentence. 1. Let’s meet on thursday, april 24. ______________________________________________ 2. My neighbor, mr. cooper, has a cat named biscuit. ______________________________________________ 3. Her grandparents live in tampa, florida. ______________________________________________ 4. Are you going to houston for thanksgiving? ______________________________________________ 5. My favorite movies are frozen and shrek. ______________________________________________ 6. I enjoy reading scholastic news each friday. ______________________________________________ 7. Did you know that eric’s birthday is december 7? ______________________________________________ 8. They spend the summer in a cabin on lake erie. ______________________________________________ Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4018 Proper Nouns April
SAM A verb is an action word. Most verbs are things you can do. You can walk, sit, cry, laugh, and keep. Verbs show when the action happens. They do this with a past tense, a present tense, and a future tense. The ending of the verb changes to match the subject. The subject is the one who does the action. The verb to be is not an action verb. Instead, it shows that something exists. It is a really strange verb. It has eight different forms. They include am, is, are, was, were, be, been, and being. Past Tense (Already Happened) Present Tense (Right Now) Future Tense (Will Happen Later) Jayden walked. Jayden walks. or Jayden is walking. Jayden will walk. or Jayden will be walking. Past Tense (Already Happened) Present Tense (Right Now) Future Tense (Will Happen Later) I was. He was. They were. I am. He is. They are. I will be. He will be. They will be. The dog sat. The dog sits. or The dog is sitting. The dog will sit. or The dog will be sitting. Krista cried. Krista cries. or Krista is crying. Krista will cry. or Krista will be crying. They laughed. They laugh. or They are laughing. They will laugh. or They will be laughing. We kept the cat. We keep the cat. or We are keeping the cat. We will keep the cat. or We will be keeping the cat. Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4019 Verbs
Read each sentence. Circle its verb. Remember that sometimes the verb is more than one word. 1. Grandma mopped the kitchen floor. 2. The roar of the ocean fills Joel’s ears. 3. They will come to my party on Saturday. 4. The baby cried for her bottle. 5. The snow is sliding down the side of the mountain! 6. We were standing in line at the bank. 7. Please do this with me. 8. I am leaving for the fair. 9. Hugh will be going home in half an hour. 10. Tessa smiled at the woman with the dog. 12 6 9 3 1 11 2 10 4 5 7 8 Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4019 Verbs
A sentence always begins with a capital letter, ends with a terminal punctuation mark, and can stand alone. It presents a complete idea. A sentence must end with a period, a question mark, or an exclamation point. Those are the terminal marks. [ . ? ! ] There are four kinds of sentences. Statements tell. Sharon walked to the park . Commands give an order. The subject You is not stated. It is understood. Open the door . Questions ask. Are you going on the field trip ? Exclamations show excitement. I just got a puppy ! An incomplete sentence is one that does not begin with a capital letter OR does not end with terminal punctuation mark OR does not make sense If you read an incomplete sentence, you say, “Huh?” You get just a piece of information. It is as if someone cut off the start or end of the sentence. This leaves you with questions. It is clear that something is missing: It is almost (It is almost what? And where is the punctuation mark?) in the spring. (In the spring what happened or will happen? And where is the capital letter?) How did? (Who did what? What is this even about?) the red car (What about the car?) SAM Complete & Incomplete Sentences Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4020
Read each sentence. Label it C for complete sentence or I for incomplete sentence. 1. ______ Where are you going? 2. ______ at the zoo. 3. ______ Before we begin. 4. ______ You are a good writer. 5. ______ I enjoy Thanksgiving dinner! 6. ______ Will Frank come to visit us? 7. ______ Stop doing that! 8. ______ starting next Saturday, 9. ______ This is so much fun! 10. ______ Is it raining? C Complete & Incomplete Sentences Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4020
There are three elements in every story. The characters are the people or animals that are in the story. The narrator may be a person in the story or a person who is telling the story about someone else. SAM The cracked mirror hung crooked from its broken frame. Lisa fought back tears. It was her mother’s mirror. It had been in her family for years. Her mother had brought it across the sea when she moved to America. And now Lisa had wrecked it by throwing a FrisbeeTM in the house. In the story text below, the characters are shown in green. The setting is shown in red. The plot problem is shown in blue. The setting is the time and place that the story happens. It can take place long ago, right now, or in the future. The events can happen here or on another continent or even another planet! The plot is the series of events that occur in the story. The plot is based on a problem. It has a beginning, middle, and end. The beginning “sets the stage.” You meet the characters and find out the problem. In the middle, there is a lot of action. The characters work to solve their problem. By the end, the problem has been solved. First... next... then... finally... Story Elements 12 6 9 3 1 11 2 10 4 5 7 8 Frisb ee Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4021
Read the stories. Answer the questions. Barry ran as fast as he could. His feet pounded on the sidewalk. He yelled his dog’s name over and over. How could she have gone so far so fast? If only he hadn’t left the door open! Just then Lamar turned the corner on his bike. Barry yelled to him, “Lamar, my dog is loose! Will you ride in the other direction and look for her?” Kwan couldn’t believe it. He glared at the eye doctor like she was a monster. His big brother didn’t need glasses. His mother and father didn’t need glasses. So why did Kwan need glasses? It just wasn’t fair! His whole day had been bad. He had missed the bus. Then they had spaghetti for lunch, and he hated spaghetti. He had not done well on the spelling test. But finding out he needed glasses was just the worst. People teased him because he was so short. Now they would tease him for wearing glasses, too. 6. Who is the character? __________________________________ 7. What is the setting? ____________________________________ 8. What is the plot problem? ________________________________ _____________________________________________________ 1. Who are the characters? _________________________________ 2. What is the setting? _____________________________________ 3. What happens in the beginning? ____________________________ ______________________________________________________ 4. What happens in the middle? ______________________________ ______________________________________________________ 5. What happens in the end? ________________________________ ______________________________________________________ Story Elements Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4021
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