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Flip Charts

English Language Arts Grade 4 Flip Chart Set

English Language Arts, Grade 4

 
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Copyright © NewPath Learning. All rights reserved. www.newpathlearning.com Charts Charts \|xiFBGIGy00692tz] 32-4001 Curriculum Mastery Curriculum Mastery® ® Flip Charts Flip Charts Combine Essential ELA Skills Combine Essential ELA Skills with Hands-On Review! with Hands-On Review! Grade Grade 4 4 4 4 4 4 Sturdy, Free-Standing Design, Perfect for Learning Centers! Reverse Side Features Questions, Labeling Exercises, Vocabulary Review & more!
ELA Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts provide comprehensive coverage of key standards-based concepts in an illustrated format that is visually appealing, engaging and easy to use. Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts are “write-on/wipe-off” and can be used with the entire classroom, with small groups or by students working independently. This Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart Set features 10 double-sided laminated charts that introduce English Language Arts standards and write-on/wipe off activities for student use or for small group instruction Built-in sturdy free-standing easel for easy display Spiral bound for ease of use Activity Guide with blackline masters of the charts for students to use in centers or independently Ideal for In class instruction for interactive presentations and demonstrations Hands-on student use Teaching resource to supplement any program Learning Centers Stand alone reference for review of key ELA concepts C B A Root Words, Prefixes & Suffixes Text Features Parts of a Book Literary Elements: Figures of Speech Main Idea & Supporting Details Inferences Elements of Fiction Analogies Punctuation Spelling: Plurals & Possessives Chart # 1: Chart # 2: Chart # 3: Chart # 4: Chart # 5: Chart # 6: Chart # 7: Chart # 8: Chart # 9: Chart #10: HOW TO USE Classroom Use Each ELA Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart can be used for enhancing reading comprehension and language arts instruction. The front page of each Flip Chart provides graphical representation of the topic in a concise, grade appropriate reading level for instructing students. The reverse side of each Flip Chart provides activities for students to practice. Note: Be sure to use an appropriate dry-erase marker and to test it on a small section of the chart prior to using it. The Activity Guide included provides a black-line master of each Flip Chart which students can use to fill in before, during or after instruction. ELA Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts are a great supplement to any ELA program. While the activities in the guide can be used in conjunction with the Flip Charts, they can also be used individually for review or as a form of assessment or in combination with other related classroom activities. Learning Centers Each Flip Chart provides students with a quick illustrated view of grade appropriate language arts concepts. Students may use these Flip Charts in small group settings along with the corresponding activity pages contained in the guide to learn or review concepts already covered in class. Students may also use these charts as reference while playing NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Independent Student Use Students can use the hands-on Flip Charts to practice and learn independently by first studying Side 1 of the chart and then using Side 2 of the chart, or the corresponding graphical activities contained in the guide, to fill in the answers and assess their understanding. Reference/Teaching Resource Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts are a great visual supplement to any curriculum or they can be used in conjunction with NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Phone: 800-507-0966 Fax: 800-507-0967 www.newpathlearning.com NewPath Learning® products are developed by teachers using research-based principles and are classroom tested. The company’s product line consists of an array of proprietary curriculum review games, workbooks, charts, posters, visual learning guides, interactive whiteboard software and other teaching resources. All products are supplemented with web-based activities, assessments and content to provide an engaging means of educating students on key, curriculum-based topics correlated to applicable state and national education standards. Copyright © 2015 NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Curriculum Mastery® and NewPath Learning® are registered trademarks of NewPath Learning LLC. Visit www.newpathlearning.comfor a digital version of this Flip Chart set and other Online Resources.
A root word is a word before a prefix or a suffix is added to it. Sometimes root words are called base words. A prefix is a group of letters added to the start of a root word that change its meaning. A suffix is a group of letters added to the end of a root word that change its meaning. In the word incorrect, the root word is correct. The prefix in- means not. This equation is incorrect: 4 x 8 = 34. In the word collectible, the root word is collect. The suffixes -ible or -able added to a word means able to be. A collectible is an item that can be collected, such as comic books. In the word worker, the base word is work. The suffix -er added to the word means a person who. gardener means a person who gardens Be careful with that dish! It’s breakable. (The dish would be easy to break.) In the word nonstick, the root word is stick. The prefix is non-, which means not. Use this nonstick frying pan. The prefix mis- means not. Emily misspoke. (Emily did not say the right thing.) reader means a person who reads Root Words, Prefixes & Suffixes Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4034
Add the prefix or suffix to each root word. Write the new word on the line. 1. sell + er = _____________________ 2. mis + understood = _____________________ 3. comfort + able = _____________________ 4. in + ability = _____________________ 5. non + fat = _____________________ 6. in + direct = _____________________ 7. build + er = _____________________ 8. response + ible = _____________________ 9. drive + er = _____________________ 10. non + profit = _____________________ 11. mis + heard = _____________________ 12. in + divide + ible = _______________________ (be careful—the de is dropped and a new letter is added) TAXI Root Words, Prefixes & Suffixes Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4034
headline heading caption byline explanation A wolf in Yellowstone. Photo courtesy of NPS. Nonfiction text has a title that may be called a headline. The writer’s name, or byline, may appear in small print right after the headline. Text headings introduce different sections. Use them to scan the article to find the part you want to read. There may be an image with tiny print beneath. The tiny print is a caption. It tells something about the image or is a byline telling who created the image. If you see an asterisk (*) or a tiny number1 in the text, look at the end of the article for more information. In this article, the asterisk leads you to an explanation. Rewilding Yellowstone National Park Debra Housel By the end of the twentieth century, humans had taken over the world. In doing so, they got rid of any animals that caused them trouble. Over time, problems arose. Without the animals that had been killed, ecosystems became unbalanced. No Wolves Equals Trouble By 1926, people had killed all the wolves in Yellowstone Park. Without wolves, the elk in the park had no predators. Their numbers grew out of control. They started to eat all the willow in the park. Willow roots had held the stream banks in place. Without the willows, there was too much erosion.* The beavers left the park. There wasn’t enough willow for them to cut and make dams. Wolves Return In 1994, scientists decided to bring wolves back to the park using a process called rewilding. First, wolves were caught in Canada. Next, they were trucked to Yellowstone. Then, they lived in huge pens in the park to get used to the new area. Dead animals found in the Park were thrown into the pens. This let the wolves get used to their new diet. Finally, the wolves were released. Changes in the Park What about the elk? Their numbers dropped. Willow grew along the streams again. The beavers returned and built dams in the streams. This created ponds, which offered a home to many different kinds of animals. There were people who feared that the Yellowstone wolves would kill people. They fought against the rewilding. But it has been more than two decades since the wolves returned, and not a single person has been harmed. *Erosion occurs when water carries away dirt and rocks. Text Features Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4035
First, read the article. Then, add an appropriate headline, two text headings, and a caption for the map. ______________________________________ D. J. Barry On April 25, 2015, the county of Nepal had its worst earthquake in 80 years. A strong tremor of 7.8 on the Richter scale rocked the tiny nation. Its buildings were not made to withstand such a bad quake. Many of them crumbled. One was the Maju Deval Temple, which was built in 1690. It had been a popular tourist site. ______________________________________ The human loss was even worse than the destruction of so many old buildings. More than 7,000 people died immediately. They were buried under the rubble of fallen structures. The quake caused landslides, too. Huge boulders and mounds of dirt slid down the sides of mountains. These landslides blocked many of the only roads into tiny mountain villages. The people in these places were cut off from food and medical care. This caused thousands more to die. ______________________________________ Nepal is the home of Mount Everest, the world’s tallest mountain. People come from all over the world to climb it each spring. Sadly, the quake happened during the climbing season. More than 20 climbers died when the quake caused a huge avalanche. An avalanche is like a landslide but with snow. The climbers were buried under tons of snow. Maju Deval Temple before the earthquake CHINA NEPAL INDIA BANGLADESH BHUTAN earthquake epicenter Mt. Everest Kathmandu ______________________ Text Features Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4035
Nonfiction books have three parts that fiction books do not. They have a table of contents, an index, and often, a glossary. Table of Contents The table of contents is in the front of the book right after the title and copyright page. It lists the names of all the chapters, or sections, in the book. Each chapter name is followed by the page number on which the chapter begins. Use a table of contents: when you want to see what the broad ideas are in a book when you know the chapter you want and want to know the page it starts on Glossary A glossary is a miniature dictionary that appears near the end of the book before the index. It gives a list of key terms and their definitions. The glossary includes only words specific to the book’s topic. What is a Mammal? . . . . . . . . 3 Kinds of Mammals . . . . . . . . . 10 Odd Mammals . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 carnivore an animal that eats only meat (other animals) gestation the amount of time a mammal spends developing inside its mother habitat the place where an animal lives in nature herbivore an animal that eats only plants Index An index is found at the end of a book. It is an alphabetical list of all the ideas in the book. Each idea is followed by all the page numbers on which the idea appears. An index has small print and multiple columns. When you do research, the first thing you check in a book is its index to see if it has what you seek. An index is like a keyword search in a search engine. You look for your keywords in the index. aestivation, 21 herbivore, 12-13 skunk, 21 anteater, 14-15 hibernation, 21 squirrel, 13,15 ape, 10 human, 3, 9-10 wolf, 9, 11 Excerpts from Housel, Debra J. Mammal Mania. Teacher Created Materials, Inc. Huntington Beach, California: 2012. Used with permission. Parts of a Book Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4036
Use the table of contents, glossary, and index to answer the questions. 1. Beginning on what page would you expect to find information about television? _________ 2. In what chapter would the World Wide Web be mentioned? ______________________ 3. Which term explains how cell phone signals move? ____________________________ 4. Which term tells about picture-based writing? ________________________________ 5. On which page is movable type discussed? __________________________________ 6. According to the index, which topic appears on the most pages? ____________________ 7. What does the hyphen between page numbers mean? __________________________ _________________________________________________________________ Table of Contents Reading and Writing ................................ 3 Hearing Words .......................................12 Putting Sight and Sound Together..............16 Communicating by Satellite ...................... 8 Computers and the Internet...................... 20 Glossary cell phone a mobile phone that works by radio waves and cell towers cell tower a tower with many antennas which sends and receives radio waves from cell phones communication sharing information through reading, writing, speaking, listening, and watching cuneiform picture-based writing that was carved into clay tablets by writers long ago e-mail an electronic message sent between computers fiber optic cable a bundle of thin glass fibers that carry information in the form of light energy Index Braille, 7, 24-25 camera, 16-18, 24-25 cell phone, 14 computer, 18-25 Morse Code, 12 movies, 16-17, 24-25 phonograph, 24-25 transistor, 15, 24-25 type (movable), 5 typewriter, 9, 24-25 word processor, 10 World Wide Web, 21-25 Excerpts from Housel, Debra J. Inventions in Commu- nications. Teacher Created Materials, Inc. Huntington Beach, California: 2012. Used with permission. M 2 M2 C 1 GH I PQ RS Parts of a Book Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4036
Authors use figures of speech in their writing to make the text interesting. They are not meant to be taken literally. They speak to the reader’s imagination and help the reader to form a mental image of the scene. A simile is a figure of speech. It is a comparison that uses the words like or as. Here are some examples: I flicked the switch, and the overhead light snapped on. It made the room as bright as the noonday sun. Dad watched Drake sleeping and thought that he looked as innocent as a newborn baby. Gwen was so thin she was bony; her mother said that she ate like a bird. When Suzanne laughed, she sounded like a hyena. A metaphor is another figure of speech. It is a comparison that does not use the words like or as. Here are some examples: My car is a real lemon. A car that’s a lemon is “sour” because it has a lot of flaws. Brian snapped, “Quit being such a crab!” Brian is not talking to an actual crab. He’s speaking to a person who is being cross and ill-tempered. William shielded his eyes and looked out across the water that sparkled with a thousand diamonds. This is just an interesting way to state how the light is reflecting from the water’s surface. When Ms. Mertz entered the room, Carter flew to her and became a clinging vine, attached to her leg. This is just an interesting way to help the reader envision how the child acted the moment he saw his mother. NY134 56 Literary Elements: Figures of Speech Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4037
Finish each sentence using a simile from the box. One simile is not used. 1. The jet engine’s roar was _________________________________________. 2. I tried to bite the biscuit, but it was _________________________________________. 3. We wouldn’t get there in time unless Zack stopped _________________________________________! 4. Her wetsuit was so tight that it _________________________________________. 5. The toddler’s pink cheeks _________________________________________. 6. They crept through the darkened house _________________________________________. 7. Ryan was so hungry he _________________________________________. 8. Melissa sank down, threw her hands over her face, and _________________________________________. as hard as a rock cried like a baby fit like a glove as quietly as a mouse looked like roses ate like a pig as stubborn as a mule as loud as thunder moving like a snail 12 6 9 3 1 11 2 10 4 5 7 8 Literary Elements: Figures of Speech Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4037
The main idea is what a paragraph or a passage is mostly about. The main idea is supported by details. Sometimes, the main idea is stated. Often it is not. Then you have to figure it out based on the details. What is this passage mostly about? The sky is black. Clouds roil, thunder rumbles, and lightning flashes. The radio issues a tornado warning. Suddenly, a dark cloud stretches toward the ground like a living thing. It twists wildly, growing thinner and longer until it touches down. It's a tornado! People run for cover. They hide in their basements or storm cellars. Most people, that is. Other people jump in their trucks. They drive toward the tornado! Are they crazy? No. They are storm chasers. They risk their lives to gather data about these deadly weather events. Main idea: Most people get out of the way of a tornado, but storm chasers drive toward it. (The main idea is not stated in a single sentence. It must be pulled together from the text. ) Supporting details: (1) People run for cover. (2) They hide in their basements or storm cellars. (3) Storm chasers risk their lives to gather data about these deadly weather events. What is this passage mostly about? Paid storm chasers are meteorologists. That means they have earned a college degree in weather science. They watch radar screens. They try to predict when and where the worst storms will occur. When they feel confident that a tornado will form, they drive to the area. Once they see a tornado, they race to meet it. Why? The storm chasers want to place tornado pods in the twister's path. A tornado's spinning winds may exceed 300 miles per hour! It will suck up the pod like a huge vacuum cleaner. The pod takes photos, wind, and temperature readings. It sends out a radio signal so it can be found after the tornado drops it. The data gathered by the pod helps meteorologists learn what goes on inside a tornado. Main idea: The storm chasers want to place tornado pods in the twister's path. (The main idea is stated in a single sentence. ) Supporting details: (1) Meteorologists predict the worst storms. (2) They put tornado pods in the storm’s path. (3) The pod takes photos, wind, and temperature readings. (4) The data gathered by the pod helps meteorologists learn about tornadoes. Main Idea & Supporting Details Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4038
Main idea: Supporting Details: Read the text. Use the information to complete the graphic organizer. Alexander von Humboldt is the father of modern geography. Geography is the study of Earth's features such as rivers, mountains, and climates. Alexander’s discoveries helped us to understand our Earth. In 1799 he teamed up with Aime Bonpland. The pair sailed to South America. At that time, little was known about the continent. The men explored the Orinoco and Amazon Rivers. They took notes about the plants and animals they saw in the rain forest. They climbed in the Andes Mountains, too. Alexander saw that the coasts of South America and Africa fit together like puzzle pieces. He guessed that they had once been joined. In fact, 250 million years ago, all seven continents were one big land mass. Then, they drifted apart. They moved just a few inches each year. They are still moving today. Alexander was the first scientist to explain this continental drift. Alexander von Humboldt 1769-1859 Main Idea & Supporting Details Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4038
When you guess, you make a prediction based on very little information. A guess has about a 50 percent chance of being right. One example is guessing if a baby boy or girl will be born. When you infer, you make a prediction based on evidence and logical thinking. An inference is a reasonable guess. You can defend your inference by pointing to the evidence. One example is when you see dark clouds and flashes of lightning in the distance. You infer that a rainstorm is coming toward you. You used evidence (dark clouds and lightning) and logic (dark clouds and lightning often bring rain) to infer. Read this paragraph and then answer the inference questions: When the giant panda was first discovered, scientists thought it was related to the red panda. Just like the red panda, the giant panda's diet is 95 percent bamboo. Both animals are endangered. But that is all that the two species have in common. Red pandas are mostly nocturnal. That means that they sleep during the day and are awake at night. Answers: 1. FALSE. Reread the first sentence. It is clear that the red panda was discovered first. 2. FALSE. You can use the illustrations to make that inference. You can also use the statement that the species have only two things in common: what they eat, and the fact they’re both endangered. 3. TRUE. The sentence about red pandas being nocturnal comes after the statement, “But that is all the two species have in common.” That means that giant pandas are not nocturnal. Otherwise, it would be a trait they share with the red pandas. Circle the correct response. 1. The red panda got its name because scientists thought it was a relative of the giant panda. TRUE FALSE 2. Red pandas look similar to giant pandas. TRUE FALSE 3. Giant pandas are not nocturnal. TRUE FALSE Giant Panda Red Panda Inferences Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4039
Read the passage below. For each inference, circle TRUE or FALSE. Then, on the lines provided, defend your answer. Wonderful, Weird Bamboo Bamboo is the tallest member of the grass family. It grows faster than any other plant on Earth. It can grow almost 3 feet in a single day and reach its full height of 93 feet in just four months! Although bamboo is a grass, it has a woody stem. And it’s so tall that it looks like a thin tree. Different kinds of bamboo grow on every continent but Antarctica. Bamboo must flower to produce seeds. But bamboo is very strange. It may not flower for 120 years! No one knows what causes it to flower. Flowering bamboo is a big problem. All the bamboo plants in the forest flower at once. Animals that eat bamboo will not eat it once it flowers. At that point, it has no nutrients. When the blooms’ seeds drop, the bamboo stalks die. Then there is no food in the forest until the new bamboo shoots poke out of the ground. The giant panda relies on bamboo for its food. One giant panda can eat 40 pounds of bamboo stalks, stems, and leaves each day! When a bamboo forest flowers, it often wipes out the wild panda population in that area. 1. Algae is the world’s fastest-growing plant. TRUE FALSE _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ 2. Some people get confused and think bamboo is a tree. TRUE FALSE _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ 3. Bamboo plants produce seeds every five years. TRUE FALSE _______________________________________________________ 4. Bamboo grows in Europe. TRUE FALSE _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ 5. Why do wild pandas die when a bamboo forest flowers? _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ Inferences Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4039
There are three elements in every work of fiction. The characters are the people or animals that are in the story. The narrator may be a person in the story or a person who is telling the story about someone else. The setting is the time and place that the story happens. It can take place long ago, right now, or in the distant future. The events can happen here or on another continent or even another planet! The plot is the series of events that occur in the story. The plot is based on a problem. It has a beginning, middle, and end. The beginning “sets the stage.” You meet the characters and find out the problem. In the middle, there is a rising action. The characters work to solve their problem. Then, there is a climax. It is the most exciting moment in the story. It is followed by falling action. By the end, the problem has been solved. The solution is called the resolution. In the story below, the character is shown in green. The setting is shown in red. The plot problem is shown in blue. In this story, the narrator is not a character and is telling what’s happening to Burt as if he were watching the scene from above. Burt looked around the dark, cheerless basement. There were two windows high up on the walls. Although they were small, he might have been able to climb out them. However, they were both blocked by black metal bars. He had already tried the door at the top of the stairs, which had at least three deadbolts on it. Of course the bolts were thrown from the other side. Burt held his head in frustration. He was trapped, and nobody knew where he was! See how the same story changes when the narrator is the character Burt: I looked around the dark, cheerless basement. There were two windows high up on the walls. Although they were small, I was so desperate I might have been able to squeeze through them. However, they both had black metal bars blocking them. I had already tried the door at the top of the stairs, which had at least three deadbolts on it. Of course the bolts were thrown from the other side. I held my head and tried to fight down the panic. I was trapped, and nobody knew where I was! Which version do you prefer? Elements of Fiction Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4040
Read each passage. Then, identify the elements of fiction for it. The Sheriff of Nottingham swore that he himself would get Robin Hood. He wanted that reward money. The Sheriff did not know about the group of men Robin had gathered about himself in Sherwood Forest. He thought that he could serve a warrant for his arrest as if Robin were any other man. Of course he had no idea where to find Robin. So the Sheriff offered 8 gold coins to any man who would serve this warrant. But the men of Nottingham knew more about Robin Hood and his doings than the Sheriff did. No one dared to serve a warrant upon the bold outlaw. Two weeks passed, and in that time, no one came forward to do the Sheriff’s business. adapted from