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Flip Charts

English Language Arts Grade 6 Flip Chart Set

English Language Arts, Grade 6

 
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Copyright © NewPath Learning. All rights reserved. www.newpathlearning.com Charts Charts \|xiFBGIGy00694nzW 32-6001 Curriculum Mastery Curriculum Mastery® ® Flip Charts Flip Charts Combine Essential ELA Skills Combine Essential ELA Skills with Hands-On Review! with Hands-On Review! Grade Grade 6 6 6 6 6 6 Sturdy, Free-Standing Design, Perfect for Learning Centers! Reverse Side Features Questions, Labeling Exercises, Vocabulary Review & more!
ELA Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts provide comprehensive coverage of key standards-based concepts in an illustrated format that is visually appealing, engaging and easy to use. Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts are “write-on/wipe-off” and can be used with the entire classroom, with small groups or by students working independently. This Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart Set features 10 double-sided laminated charts that introduce English Language Arts standards and write-on/wipe off activities for student use or for small group instruction Built-in sturdy free-standing easel for easy display Spiral bound for ease of use Activity Guide with blackline masters of the charts for students to use in centers or independently Ideal for In class instruction for interactive presentations and demonstrations Hands-on student use Teaching resource to supplement any program Learning Centers Stand alone reference for review of key ELA concepts C B A Roots Prefixes & Suffixes Spelling Patterns Parts of a Book Context Clues Making Predictions Analogies Sequencing Punctuation: Commas, Semicolons, Colons Spelling Homonyms & Odd Plurals Chart # 1: Chart # 2: Chart # 3: Chart # 4: Chart # 5: Chart # 6: Chart # 7: Chart # 8: Chart # 9: Chart #10: HOW TO USE Classroom Use Each ELA Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart can be used for enhancing reading comprehension and language arts instruction. The front page of each Flip Chart provides graphical representation of the topic in a concise, grade appropriate reading level for instructing students. The reverse side of each Flip Chart provides activities for students to practice. Note: Be sure to use an appropriate dry-erase marker and to test it on a small section of the chart prior to using it. The Activity Guide included provides a black-line master of each Flip Chart which students can use to fill in before, during or after instruction. ELA Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts are a great supplement to any ELA program. While the activities in the guide can be used in conjunction with the Flip Charts, they can also be used individually for review or as a form of assessment or in combination with other related classroom activities. Learning Centers Each Flip Chart provides students with a quick illustrated view of grade appropriate language arts concepts. Students may use these Flip Charts in small group settings along with the corresponding activity pages contained in the guide to learn or review concepts already covered in class. Students may also use these charts as reference while playing NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Independent Student Use Students can use the hands-on Flip Charts to practice and learn independently by first studying Side 1 of the chart and then using Side 2 of the chart, or the corresponding graphical activities contained in the guide, to fill in the answers and assess their understanding. Reference/Teaching Resource Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts are a great visual supplement to any curriculum or they can be used in conjunction with NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Phone: 800-507-0966 Fax: 800-507-0967 www.newpathlearning.com NewPath Learning® products are developed by teachers using research-based principles and are classroom tested. The company’s product line consists of an array of proprietary curriculum review games, workbooks, charts, posters, visual learning guides, interactive whiteboard software and other teaching resources. All products are supplemented with web-based activities, assessments and content to provide an engaging means of educating students on key, curriculum-based topics correlated to applicable state and national education standards. Copyright © 2015 NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Curriculum Mastery® and NewPath Learning® are registered trademarks of NewPath Learning LLC. Visit www.newpathlearning.comfor a digital version of this Flip Chart set and other Online Resources.
1/2 MOVIE DIRECTOR DATE SCENE TAKE Many English words come from other languages, especially Greek and Latin. Roots are Greek and Latin words that form the basis of many English words. Examples action, activity, actress, react, transact, actor audible, audience, audition, auditorium, audiovisual, auditory biology, autobiography, biopsy, antibiotic fraction, fracking, fracture, refraction (breaking light ray) biography, photography, autograph illuminate, lumens, luminous, luminescent, luminary manual labor, manipulate, manufacturer, manuscript naval, navigate, navy pedal, pedestrian, pedestal, biped phobic, claustrophobia, hydrophobia, xenophobia, arachnophobia import, export, portable, porter, transport, portage Root act aud bio frac graph lum man nav ped phob port spec Means do hear life break write light hand ship foot fear carry see inspection, spectacle, bespectacled, perspective, spectral, spectators Roots Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4056
These words have a Greek or Latin root. Draw a line to match each word to its definition. Use your knowledge of roots instead of a dictionary. A. a person’s life story written by the person himself B. a person who carries another’s luggage C. a famous, successful person D. fear of closed or small spaces E. a person who watches an event F. the part of the world in which life can exist G. a clever or skillful movement H. a large device that makes nuclear energy I. injection of water into rock at high pressure to release natural gas J. to travel around the world by ship or plane K. able to be heard L. an insect-like creature that is long, thin, and has many legs 1. reactor 2. audible 3. maneuver 4. circumnavigate 5. autobiography 6. fracking 7. claustrophobic 8. luminary 9. centipede 10. biosphere 11. spectator 12. porter Roots Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4056
A prefix is added to the start of a word to change its meaning. Prefix anti- against antiwar, antislavery, antisocial antibiotic contra- against contraband, contradict, contrary, contraindicated contrast dis- opposite disagree, disarm, discontinue, dishonest disintegrate post- after postdated, postpone, postwar, posthumous postscript P.S. I Love You quad- four quart, quarter, quadrant, quadruplets quadrilateral trans- across transatlantic, translate, transfer transcribe Means Examples A suffix is added to the endof a word to change its meaning. Suffix -ess female who duchess, empress, hostess, actress, lioness waitress -ical relating to chemical, comical, surgical, economical, quizzical identical -cian one who works clinician, magician, pediatrician, electrician musician -ish turns a word into an adjective boyish, reddish, selfish, ticklish, stylish sluggish -ly resembling carefully, friendly, happily, ordinarily, warmly angrily -ology the study of astrology, psychology, technology, zoology geology Means Examples Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4057 Prefixes & Suffixes
Circle the prefix or suffix of each word. Some words have both a prefix and a suffix. Write what the word means on the line. You may use a dictionary if necessary. Use the word in a sentence. 1. politician = ______________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ 2. amatuerish = _____________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ 3. contradiction = ___________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ 4. transportable = ___________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ 5. disregard = ______________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ 6. critical = ________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ 7. postnasal = ______________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ 8. anti-inflammatory = ________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ 9. mythology = _____________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ 10 . goddess = _____________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4057 Prefixes & Suffixes
Spelling patterns are groups of letters that are common to many words. Here are some that commonly cause spelling problems: A noun that ends in f changes the f to v and adds es to show the plural. one knife but two knives one half but two halves one wife but three wives A noun that ends in f often has a related verb that ends in ve. The police looked for proof. The judge felt the evidence proves his guilt. (noun) (verb) We enjoy life to the fullest! They live just down the street. (noun) (verb) She holds Buddhist beliefs. She believes in the Buddha’s teachings. (noun) (verb) The letters oi and oy create the vowel sound oi as in oil. The man was annoyed by the noise. Our family rejoiced when we adopted the bunny from the shelter. Her employer told her she’d get a raise. Some words begin with silent letters; these just have to be memorized. silent g: gnarled, gnashing, gnats, gnawed, gnome silent k: knitting, knoll, kneel, knob, knowledgeable, knuckles silent w: wrap, wrath, wrongful, write, wren, wreak, wrestle, wrinkle one hoof but four hooves Spelling Patterns Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4058
_____ 9. As a result of the storm, two people lost their lifes. _____ 5. A wrinkly rat nawed on the poison. Correct the misspelled word in each sentence. You can use a dictionary if you need to. If the sentence is correct as it stands, write NC for no change. _____ 1. Please put three knifes on the table. _____ 2. I ate three oisters at the picnic. _____ 3. A coywolf is a cross between a coyote and a wolf. _____ 4. He knelt to put the garden nome in his front yard. _____ 7. We will boicott the company until it pays its employees better. _____ 6. The police officer told the teens to stop loytering in the mall. _____ 8. The knowledgeable doctor wrapped her wrist in a bandage. _____ 11. Six wives were busy embroidering. _____ 10. She turned the nob, opened the door, and saw the boys. _____ 12. Do you belief in ghosts? _____ 13. You were wrong to rite such a mean note! _____ 14. The fox scratched at its gnat bites. Spelling Patterns Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4058
Nonfiction books have three parts that fiction books do not. They have a table of contents, an index, and often, a glossary. Table of Contents The table of contents is in the front of the book right after the title and copyright page. It lists the names of all the chapters, or sections, in the book. Each chapter name is followed by the page number on which the chapter begins. Use a table of contents: when you want to see what the broad ideas are in a book when you know the chapter you want and want to know the page it starts on Glossary A glossary is a miniature dictionary that appears near the end of the book before the index. It gives a list of key terms and their definitions. The glossary includes only words specific to the book’s topic. What is an Invertebrate?............ 4 Simple Invertebrates ................10 Mollusks ................................16 Arthropods ............................22 arachnids eight-legged arthropods that eat other animals or their blood arthropods invertebrates with jointed legs and a hard outer structure called an exoskeleton bivalves mollusks with hinged shells budding reproducing by growing offspring on the parent’s outer body Index An index is found at the end of a book. It is an alphabetical list of all the ideas in the book. Each idea is followed by all the page numbers on which the idea appears. An index has small print and multiple columns. When you do research, the first thing you check in a book is its index to see if it has what you seek. An index is like a keyword search in a search engine. You look for your keywords in the index. aestivation, 17 herbivore, 9 sea anemone, 7 arachnid, 25 insects, 22, 25 sea nettle, 11 arthropod, 22-25 jellyfish, 5, 10-12 sponge, 10, 12-13 Excerpts from Housel, Debra J. Incredible Invertebrates. Teacher Created Materials, Inc. Huntington Beach, California: 2012. Used with permission. Parts of a Book Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4059
Use the table of contents, glossary, and index to answer the questions. 1. On what page does The Exchange Rate chapter start? _________ 2. What is the title of the chapter that would include information about bartering? _______________________________________________________ 3. In what chapter would dollar bills first be mentioned? ___________________________ 4. Which term explains an illegal form of money? _________________________________ 5. Which term tells what coins are made of? ____________________________________ 6. What does the acronym ATM stand for? _____________________________________ 7. On which page is the International Monetary Fund discussed? _________ 8. Which topic appears on the most pages? ____________________________________ 9. What does the hyphen between page numbers mean? ___________________________ Table of Contents Before There Was Money.........................4 The Invention of Money .......................... 7 Coins ...................................................8 Paper Money .......................................12 The Exchange Rate...............................16 Glossary account a record of money received or paid out alloy a mixture of two or more metals automatic teller machines (ATMs) devices that let you deposit or withdraw money from your account even in the bank is closed or you’re far from home balance the amount by which one side of an account is greater than the other side barter to trade goods or services for other goods or services counterfeit to make a false copy in order to deceive Index account, 13, 22, 24, 26, 29 alloy, 11 automatic teller machine, 24, 29 balance, 25-26 goldsmith, 13 interest, 22-23, 25 International Monetary Fund, 29 paper money, 12, 14-15, 28-29 pirates, 21 Polo, Marco, 12 shilling, 10, 17 Excerpts from Housel, Debra J. Buy It! History of Money. Teacher Created Materials, Inc. Huntington Beach, California: 2012. Used with permission. ATM Parts of a Book Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4059
You are reading and you come to a word you don’t know. You can use context clues to help you determine the word’s meaning. There are four types of context clues. In the examples shown here, the unknown word is boldfaced and the clue is underlined. Description The author realized that the reader might stumble, so the text immedi- ately offers a description to help you understand the unknown word. I didn’t want to risk my life in the makeshift raft because it looked ready to collapse on shore. Example This is similar to description except that the text offers one or more examples for the unknown word. The example(s) may be set off by commas or may be introduced with the words such as, like, including, etc. We studied meteorological events such as tornadoes, hurricanes, and microbursts. Synonym The text offers a synonym, or word that means almost the same thing as the unknown word. Ben sighed; he knew from his daughter’s scowl that she would pout for hours. Antonym The text offers an antonym, or word that means the opposite of the unknown word. You may be introduced to an antonym when you see the words although, but, yet, still, so, however, and even though . Although her shoes were caked with mud, the rest of her outfit was impeccable. NOTE: Context clues are not always in the same sentence as the unknown word. Check the sentences before and after, too. First Strategy Cover the unfamiliar word. Reread the sentence. What word would make sense? Second Strategy Look for a description or an example in the text. Look for a synonym in the text. Look for an antonym in the text. Context Clues Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4060
Read this excerpt from The Count of Monte Cristo , a famous novel by Alexandre Dumas. Determine the meaning of the underlined words from the context. Do not use a dictionary. The news of the arrival of the Pharaon had not yet reached the old man, who, mounted on a chair, was amusing himself by training with trembling hand the sprays of clematis that clambered over the trellis at his window. Suddenly, he felt an arm thrown around his body, and a well-loved voice behind him exclaimed, "Father!" The old man turned around, and, upon seeing his son, he uttered a cry and collapsed into his arms, pale and trembling. "What ails you, dearest father—are you ill?" inquired the youthful sailor, much alarmed. "No, my dear Edmond—no; but I did not expect you, and the joy, the surprise of seeing you so suddenly—I feel as though I am going to perish." "Come, cheer up, father! They say joy never hurts, and thus I came to you without warning. Come now, do smile, instead of looking at me so solemnly. Here I am back from my expedition, and we are going to be happy." "Yes, my boy, so we will," responded the old man. "Come and explain to me all that has befallen you." "God forgive me," exclaimed the young man, "for rejoicing at happiness derived from another's misery, but I did not seek this fortuitous event; it has happened, and I cannot pretend to lament it. The good Captain Leclere is dead, father, and it is probable that I shall have his position. Imagine me a captain at 20, with a hundred louis pay, plus a share in the profits! Is this not more than a penniless sailor like me could ever have hoped for?" clambered: ___________________________________________________ uttered: ______________________________________________________ perish: ______________________________________________________ solemnly: ____________________________________________________ expedition: ___________________________________________________ befallen: _____________________________________________________ derived: _____________________________________________________ fortuitous: ____________________________________________________ lament: ______________________________________________________ penniless: ____________________________________________________ Context Clues Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4060
Read this excerpt from The Count of Monte Cristo , a famous novel by Alexandre Dumas. Determine the meaning of the underlined words from the context. Do not use a dictionary. The news of the arrival of the Pharaon had not yet reached the old man, who, mounted on a chair, was amusing himself by training with trembling hand the sprays of clematis that clambered over the trellis at his window. Suddenly, he felt an arm thrown around his body, and a well-loved voice behind him exclaimed, "Father!" The old man turned around, and, upon seeing his son, he uttered a cry and collapsed into his arms, pale and trembling. "What ails you, dearest father—are you ill?" inquired the youthful sailor, much alarmed. "No, my dear Edmond—no; but I did not expect you, and the joy, the surprise of seeing you so suddenly—I feel as though I am going to perish." "Come, cheer up, father! They say joy never hurts, and thus I came to you without warning. Come now, do smile, instead of looking at me so solemnly. Here I am back from my expedition, and we are going to be happy." "Yes, my boy, so we will," responded the old man. "Come and explain to me all that has befallen you." "God forgive me," exclaimed the young man, "for rejoicing at happiness derived from another's misery, but I did not seek this fortuitous event; it has happened, and I cannot pretend to lament it. The good Captain Leclere is dead, father, and it is probable that I shall have his position. Imagine me a captain at 20, with a hundred louis pay, plus a share in the profits! Is this not more than a penniless sailor like me could ever have hoped for?" clambered: ___________________________________________________ uttered: ______________________________________________________ perish: ______________________________________________________ solemnly: ____________________________________________________ expedition: ___________________________________________________ befallen: _____________________________________________________ derived: _____________________________________________________ fortuitous: ____________________________________________________ lament: ______________________________________________________ penniless: ____________________________________________________ Context Clues Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4060
Good readers make logical guesses about what will happen based on clues from the text. Predictions are like inferences. The difference is that you make inferences about nonfiction text and predictions about fiction. Here’s an excerpt from Johann Wyss’s The Swiss Family Robinson ; the father is the narrator. This occurs near the novel’s beginning; knowing that will help you to predict what happens next. Amid the roar of the thundering waves I suddenly heard the cry of “Land ho!” while at the same instant the ship ran aground with a frightful shock. It threw everyone to the floor and seemed to portend the vessel’s immediate destruction. The breaking of the ship caused dreadful sounds, and water poured in on all sides. I heard the voice of the captain above the tumult, shouting, “Lower the lifeboats!” His words went like a dagger to my heart, but seeing my sons’ terror, I composed myself, calling out, “Take courage, my boys! We are all above water yet. There is the land not far off; let us do our best to reach it. Remain with your mother, while I go to see what is to be done.” With that, I left them and went on deck. How to Make Predictions About Characters 1. Determine what motivates a character to predict what his or her next action will be. 2. Use the character’s past behavior to predict the character’s future behavior. 3. Be ready for plot twists. If events unfolded exactly as you expected, it wouldn't be a very interesting story. 4. Change your prediction as new information comes to light. Foreshadowing Foreshadowing occurs when the author hints at future events or even the final outcome of a story. Authors use foreshadowing to build suspense. They also use it to get the reader to anticipate that something is going to happen and then throw in a plot twist to surprise the reader. Here’s an example of foreshadowing: Abdu had no idea when he left home that morning that he would never see his parents again. Based on that sentence, your prediction could be: Abdu’s parents will die. Abdu will be kidnapped by slave traders. Abdu will be abducted by aliens. Part of your prediction is based on the time period, place, and genre of story you’re reading. For example, the last idea would only work if the book is science fiction. Making Predictions Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4061
Read this excerpt from the novel The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain. Make a prediction about what will happen next. "Aunt Polly , I really did think my toe had gangrene, and it hurt so I never minded my tooth at all." "Your tooth, indeed! What's the matter with your tooth?" "One of them's loose, and it aches perfectly awful." "There, there, now , don't begin that groaning again. Open your mouth. Well—your tooth is loose, but you're not going to die about that. Mary, get me a silk thread, and a chunk of fire out of the kitchen stove." Filled with dread, Tom said, "Oh, please, auntie, don't pull it out. It don't hurt me any more. I wish I may never stir if it does! Please don't, auntie; I don't want to stay home from school." "Oh, you don't, don't you? So all this fuss was because you thought you'd get to stay home from school and go a-fishing? Tom, Tom, I love you so, and you seem to try every way you can to break my old heart with your outrageousness." The old lady made one end of the silk thread fast to Tom's loose tooth with a loop and tied the other to the bedpost. What happens next? Make a prediction in the crystal ball. After you have made your prediction, check its accuracy by reading the next part of the The Adventures of Tom Sawyer either in hard copy or online. This passage comes at the start of the sixth chapter. Making Predictions Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4061 illustration by E. W. Kemble
Analogies Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4062 AMBULANCE SERVICE An analogy shows two ideas or things that are related in some way. To solve an analogy, you must first determine the relationship between the words given. Then, look for a word to make the other pair in the analogy show the same relationship. Analogies are always worded this way: ___________ is to ___________ as ___________ is to ___________ . Comparing Parts and Wholes This analogy compares the whole to one of its parts: Car is to steering wheel as laptop is to keyboard. Comparing Objects with Their Actions This analogy matches an object to its action: Ambulance is to speeding as tiger is to hunting. Comparing with Antonyms If the analogy compares two things are opposites, it uses antonyms, which are words with opposite meanings: Full is to empty as quiet is to talkative. (Full and empty are one set of antonyms; quiet and talkative are the other set.) Comparing Shades of Meaning This analogy includes shades of meaning: Furious is to angry as glaring is to bright. (Furious is a stronger word than angry, just as a glaring light is stronger than a bright light.) Comparing with Synonyms If the analogy compares two things that are alike, it uses synonyms, which are words with similar meanings: Grieve is to mourn as gregarious is to friendly. (Grieve and mourn are one set of synonyms; gregarious and friendly are the other set.)
2. Silly is to serious as depressed is to _________________. Write a word that will complete each analogy. Use a dictionary if necessary. 1. Field is to farm as _________________ is to hand. 3. _________________ is to heat as truck is to transport. 4. _________________ is to simple as challenging is to difficult. 5. Knife is to _________________ as needle is to sew. 6. Increase is to decrease as _________________ is to straight. 7. Face is to mouth as _________________ is to bed. 9. Scratch is to gouge as _________________ is to filthy. 8. Hire is to fire as _________________ is to discard. 10. _________________ is to sight as ear is to hearing. 11. Page is to book as Arizona is to _________________. 12. Hurricane is to breeze as destitute is to _________________. 13. _________________ is to slumber as jump is to leap. Analogies Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4062
The sequence is the order in which events occur. Directions/Instructions When you are writing directions, it is essential that you put the steps in the right order so that your reader can do them in the correct sequence. Transition words (bolded in the essay below) help you to progress from one step to the next when writing about a process. Notice how these words guide you through this process essay: Fiction Transitions When you write the events in a story, it is important that your reader know the order in which they occur. The transition words used in fiction differ from those in a process essay. The most common form of fiction sequencing is a transition word or phrase that indicates the amount of time that has passed, such as: A month later, Janet waved goodbye to her family as she entered the airport. Here are a few transition words or phrases often used in fiction: suddenly after when meanwhile prior then now still afterwards in the meantime later