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Flip Charts

English Language Arts Grade 8 Flip Chart Set

English Language Arts, Grade 8

 
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Copyright © NewPath Learning. All rights reserved. www.newpathlearning.com Charts Charts \|xiFBGIGy00696rzu 32-8001 Curriculum Mastery Curriculum Mastery® ® Flip Charts Flip Charts Combine Essential ELA Skills Combine Essential ELA Skills with Hands-On Review! with Hands-On Review! Grade Grade 8 8 8 8 8 8 Sturdy, Free-Standing Design, Perfect for Learning Centers! Reverse Side Features Questions, Labeling Exercises, Vocabulary Review & more!
ELA Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts provide comprehensive coverage of key standards-based concepts in an illustrated format that is visually appealing, engaging and easy to use. Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts are “write-on/wipe-off” and can be used with the entire classroom, with small groups or by students working independently. This Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart Set features 10 double-sided laminated charts that introduce English Language Arts standards and write-on/wipe off activities for student use or for small group instruction Built-in sturdy free-standing easel for easy display Spiral bound for ease of use Activity Guide with blackline masters of the charts for students to use in centers or independently Ideal for In class instruction for interactive presentations and demonstrations Hands-on student use Teaching resource to supplement any program Learning Centers Stand alone reference for review of key ELA concepts C B A Simple, Compound & Complex Sentences Adverbs Prepositions, Conjunctions & Interjections Punctuation: Semicolons, Colons, Hyphens & Dashes Structural Analysis Regular & Irregular Verbs Sentences: Fragments, Complete & Run-on Spelling Guidelines Text Features Usage Chart # 1: Chart # 2: Chart # 3: Chart # 4: Chart # 5: Chart # 6: Chart # 7: Chart # 8: Chart # 9: Chart #10: HOW TO USE Classroom Use Each ELA Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart can be used for enhancing reading comprehension and language arts instruction. The front page of each Flip Chart provides graphical representation of the topic in a concise, grade appropriate reading level for instructing students. The reverse side of each Flip Chart provides activities for students to practice. Note: Be sure to use an appropriate dry-erase marker and to test it on a small section of the chart prior to using it. The Activity Guide included provides a black-line master of each Flip Chart which students can use to fill in before, during or after instruction. ELA Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts are a great supplement to any ELA program. While the activities in the guide can be used in conjunction with the Flip Charts, they can also be used individually for review or as a form of assessment or in combination with other related classroom activities. Learning Centers Each Flip Chart provides students with a quick illustrated view of grade appropriate language arts concepts. Students may use these Flip Charts in small group settings along with the corresponding activity pages contained in the guide to learn or review concepts already covered in class. Students may also use these charts as reference while playing NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Independent Student Use Students can use the hands-on Flip Charts to practice and learn independently by first studying Side 1 of the chart and then using Side 2 of the chart, or the corresponding graphical activities contained in the guide, to fill in the answers and assess their understanding. Reference/Teaching Resource Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts are a great visual supplement to any curriculum or they can be used in conjunction with NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Phone: 800-507-0966 Fax: 800-507-0967 www.newpathlearning.com NewPath Learning® products are developed by teachers using research-based principles and are classroom tested. The company’s product line consists of an array of proprietary curriculum review games, workbooks, charts, posters, visual learning guides, interactive whiteboard software and other teaching resources. All products are supplemented with web-based activities, assessments and content to provide an engaging means of educating students on key, curriculum-based topics correlated to applicable state and national education standards. Copyright © 2015 NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Curriculum Mastery® and NewPath Learning® are registered trademarks of NewPath Learning LLC. Visit www.newpathlearning.comfor a digital version of this Flip Chart set and other Online Resources.
A simple sentence is usually short. It contains a subject and a verb. The subject is understood in an imperative sentence such as: Let’s take the subway. A complex sentence has an independent clause that could stand alone as a sentence (shown in orange below). It also has at least one subordinate (less important) clause (shown in blue below). The subordinate clause cannot stand on its own. When the subordinate clause comes at the start of the complex sentence, it is often followed by a comma. When the subordinate clause comes at the end of the complex sentence, there is no comma. If you’re going skiing, take me along. Take me along if you’re going skiing. When you hear the buzzer, please take the chicken out of the oven. Please take the chicken out of the oven when you hear the buzzer. As a result of the accident, my mom had to buy a new car. My mom had to buy a new car as a result of the accident. A compound sentence has two or more independent clauses (sentences) joined together with a semicolon (;) or joined by a comma and a conjunction (and, but, or, for, so yet, nor ). A semicolon joins two sentences that are closely related. My wedding anniversary is July 16; the day we got married it was incredibly hot and muggy. Notice that everything before the semicolon forms a complete sentence, and everything after the semicolon forms a complete sentence. The whole thing is a compound sentence. Marla Jamison is currently serving her third term in Congress, and Walt Reardon is serving his second term. Notice that everything before the comma forms a complete sentence, and everything after the conjunction (and) forms a complete sentence. The whole thing is a compound sentence. Sam is riding a horse. Myra walks to the bus stop. BUS STOP AD1B5 76 Simple, Compound & Complex Sentences Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4078
Identify each sentence as simple (S), compound (C), or complex (X). _____ 1. Sue noticed the black car leave the parking lot as she entered the building. _____ 2. Don’t lose your credit card; it is as valuable as cash! _____ 3. You must stay in school, or you must get a job. _____ 4. Is there a Tracker’s store in our area? _____ 5. We emerged from the barn after the tornado had passed. _____ 6. If you’d like to join the club, visit our web site. _____ 7. Jason pulled the toddler away from the busy road. _____ 8. Turn left onto Hedgehog Lane. _____ 9. Before the discovery of antibiotics, people frequently died of infection. _____ 10. Attendance was high, so the carnival stayed an additional day. _____ 11. Glenn will call you for an interview when an opening occurs. _____ 12. We tiptoed into the theater because we arrived so late. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 * 0 # Arrival 10:00 am Speed Turn right on Hedgehog Lane 35 mph AD1B5 76 Simple, Compound & Complex Sentences Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4078
An adverb is a word that usually modifies (describes) a verb. An adverb tells when, where, how, and to what extent the action occurs. An adverb sometimes modifies an adjective or another adverb. My cousin is the most beautiful girl in her class. (Beautiful is an adjective modifying the noun girl; most is the adverb modifying beautiful.) The comparative form of an adverb uses the word more as in more rapidly. Use this form to compare two people or things. James swam more rapidly than Morgan. The superlative form of an adverb uses the word most as in most quietly. Use this form to compare three or more people or things. In the choir, Timothy sang the most quietly. Irregular Adverb Forms Memorize these as they don’t follow the rules. Frequency and Time Adverbs That Don’t End in -ly These are frequency adverbs: always, often, sometimes, seldom, and never. These are time adverbs: now, soon, today, tomorrow, yesterday, then, and later. Adverbs that do not end in -ly form the comparative by adding –er to the word. I found that winning this match was harder than the previous one. Adverbs that do not end in –ly form the superlative by adding –est to the word. Of all the girls on the bowling team, Janelle arrived the latest. Many adverbs end with –ly: deliberately, fortunately, innocently, usually, wearily He held the stack of boxes awkwardly. (Awkwardly tells how he is holding the boxes.) The bench had been recently painted. (Recently is an adverb describing when the bench was painted.) Adverb Comparative Form Superlative Form (they end in st) badly worse worst little less least many, much more most well better best Adverbs Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4079
Circle the adverb(s) in each sentence. Underline the word(s) that it modifies. 1. The bomb seriously wounded the soldier’s leg. 2. She brushed past the boy, rudely bumping his shoulder. 3. My parents never received my report card. 4. The noise in the bushes made Jackson crawl more hurriedly. 5. Miles says that splitting wood is easier than shoveling snow. 6. To shorten your speech, remove the two least important points. 7. He did worse in the one-mile run than Henry did. 8. That is the most heartless thing I’ve ever heard anyone say! 9. Yesterday Alex was coughing noisily. 10. Of the team members, Sheila drove the farthest. 11. Bryan held his breath the longest. 12. We always order a pizza on Friday nights. Adverbs Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4079
A preposition is a short word that connects a noun, pronoun, or other words in a sentence. It tells where something is or where it is going or when something happens. The prepositions are underlined in the examples below. The dishes are in the cabinet above the dishwasher. Sam will go with you to the beach. The baby crawled to her father. An interjection is a short word that expresses strong emotions and is followed by an exclamation point. It can be a nonsense word. Darn! I just spilled the paint! A coordinating conjunction joins words, phrases, or independent clauses (sentences). When two independent clauses (sentences) are joined by a conjunction, put a comma before the conjunction. Here are the coordinating conjunctions: and, but, yet, so, for, or, nor. The house plans looked great, so the couple signed a contract with the builder. It was Halloween, yet Raymond did not plan to go trick or treating. Janet missed the bus and had to walk to school. (When just one of the clauses joined by the conjunction is independent, no comma is used.) A subordinating conjunction joins a dependent clause (that cannot stand alone as a sentence) to an independent clause (that can stand alone as a sentence). If the subordinating conjunction comes at the start of a sentence, it is followed by a comma. When it comes at the end of a sentence, there is no comma. Here are some common subordinating conjunctions: because, after, before, if, when, as, since, although. As soon as we entered the restaurant, we were eager to order. We were eager to order as soon as we entered the restaurant. Yuck! That looks disgusting. Prepositions, Conjunctions & Interjections Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4080
Underline each preposition, conjunction, and interjection. Then, above each underlined word, identify it as a preposition (P), conjunction (C), or interjection (I). 1. Honey has a high acid content that bacteria and fungi cannot tolerate. 2. Scientists believe that birds evolved from dinosaurs based on numerous feathered dinosaur fossils. 3. When baby panda cubs are born, they are the size of a stick of margarine! 4. Ugh! My zipper just broke. 5. It takes one month for a monarch to transform from an egg to an adult butterfly. 6. Stop! Don’t go in there! 7. Kara didn’t go on the hike because she lost her boots. 8. Help! I can’t swim! 9. The laundry detergent is stored under the sink. 10. There are about 75,000 edible plants on Earth, yet just 20 provide the majority of human food. Laundry Detergent Prepositions, Conjunctions & Interjections Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4080
When to Use a Dash There is no space before or after a dash. A dash is used to set off an “aside;” that is, something you would say behind your hand. When reading, a dash surrounds an interrupting clause. Dashes should be used sparingly. Mosquitoes the world’s most annoying insects, don’t you agree?— have a lifespan of about 60 days. When to Use a Semicolon Use a semicolon to separate two closely related independent clauses (sentences) that aren’t joined by a conjunction (and, but, or, for, so yet, nor ). Note the difference in these two sentences: The horse was beautiful; it was also stubborn. The horse was beautiful, and it was stubborn. Use a semicolon to separate two closely related independent clauses (sentences) that are joined by a conjunctive adverb or transitional phrase (however, therefore, thus, for example) . Grandma was supposed to pick up Chris after school; however, she fell and broke her wrist. When to Use a Colon Use a colon in times to separate hours, minutes, and seconds. She won the marathon with a time of 2:29:37. Use a colon to introduce a long list of items. We still need to purchase these items for our trip: marshmallows, roasting sticks, matches, rope, and camp chairs. Use a colon to introduce a long quote. As President Kennedy said in his inaugural address: “And so, my fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you–ask what you can do for your country.” When to Use a Hyphen Use a hyphen to join two-part words. All self words are hyphenated, and most ex words are, too. Some words that begin with re- and pre- are also hyphenated. ex-wife self-assured father-in-law re-emerged Use a hyphen in compound adjectives. A compound adjective is when two or more words directly in front of a noun are used together to describe that noun. A well-known artist entered the room. The six-year-old girl started to cry. or -- ; : - Punctuation: Semicolons, Colons, Hyphens & Dashes Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4081
Punctuation: Semicolons, Colons, Hyphens & Dashes Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4081 These sentences are missing semicolons and colons. Insert the correct punctuation mark in the appropriate location. There may be more than one per sentence. 1. The deadline for buying tickets is August 15 therefore, bring your check on Monday. 2. Her plane is scheduled to depart at 1235 p.m. 3. Tiny mites live on your eyelashes they have eight legs and look like alligators! 4. I can’t go out tonight I have a final exam tomorrow. 5. The moon has no air thus, a hammer and a feather dropped from the same height at the same time would hit the surface simultaneously. 6. Forces always work in pairs for example, a boy pushes his skateboard and Earth pushes back. 7. The Chinese invented noodles 4,000-year-old noodles have been found buried there. 8. She completed the exam with a time of 147. 9. Mass is the same throughout the universe weight changes with gravity. 10. Mahatma Gandhi said “Live as if you were to die tomorrow learn as if you were to live forever.” 12 6 9 3 1 11 2 10 4 5 7 8
12 6 9 3 1 11 2 10 4 5 7 8 Birthday Suprise Party! Examples Word Part Means aeronautics, aerate, aerobic, aeronautical aero- air geography, geochemical, geologist geo- earth statehood, priesthood, childhood, brotherhood, fatherhood -hood state of being dictatorship, championship, relationship, friendship -ship state of being microchip, microeconomics, microfilm, microscope micro- tiny midday, midafternoon, midpoint, midlife, midriff, midnight mid- middle selfish, self-confidence, self-esteem, self-reliant (Note: Except for selfish, self words are always hyphenated. self- self semicircle, semiconscious, semiannual, semiprecious semi- half; partial adhesion, confession, emissions, recession, explosion -sion forms an abstract noun from a verb rotation, education, absorption, demonstration, invitation -tion forms an abstract noun from a verb superintendent, supernatural, superhero, superior super- more than; above under- less than; below underpaid, underemployed, underling, underinsured, underachiever, undergrowth Structural Analysis Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4082 Many English words come from other languages. Word parts that come from Greek and Latin words form the basis of many English words.
A. two or more things running into each other B. a tiny living thing that can only be seen with magnification C. to think something is less than its actual value or influence D. a substance released as a fine spray E. a strong feeling of loyalty toward a person or thing F. a dry area, yet not dry enough to be a desert G. exceeding what is necessary H. a way to earn a living I. approximately the middle; halfway J. the study of Earth and its land features K. feeling confident about oneself L. involving members of two political parties 1. aerosol 2. midway 3. bipartisanship 4. self-assured 5. collision 6. geology 7. underestimate 8. microbe 9. dedication 10. superfluous 11. semiarid 12. livelihood Draw a line to match each word to its definition. Use your knowledge of word parts instead of a dictionary. Structural Analysis Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4082
infinitive past participle as in to send am sending I am sending him an email. to play is playing The cat is playing with the feather. to smile are smiling The children are smiling. to ride will be riding We will be riding the rollercoaster. Regular & Irregular Verbs Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4083 A verb is the action or “being” part of a sentence. The verb tenses tells you when the action occurs: past, present, or future. The infinitive is the word to plus the verb: to walk; to eat; to sleep. Regular verbs form their past tenses by adding a –d or –ed to the infinitive; if the infinitive ends in y, it may change to i before the ed. infinitive past present future to lock locked lock will lock to hurry hurried hurry will hurry Irregular verbs form their past tenses in an unusual way. Only the past tense is affected. Unfortunately irregular verbs are common; they have to be memorized. There is no logical way to tell if a verb is regular or irregular by looking at the infinitive. infinitive past present future to drive drove drive will drive to slide slid slide will slide In addition, there are two kinds of verb participles—past and present. Past participles of irregular verbs are irregular, too. Past participles follow the helping verbs has , have , or had : infinitive past participle as in to order has ordered Everyone at that table has ordered a meal. to see have seen I have already seen that movie. to swim had swum Jay had swum in the lake. Present participles end in –ing and follow the helping verbs that are forms of to be, such as am , is , are , and will be :
Past tense Past Participle Present tense Present Participle Future tense ex. shrank had shrunk shrink speak jump choose ride write freeze search wear go give sit throw is shrinking will shrink 35 flavors! specials today - bubblegum toffee pumpkin Regular & Irregular Verbs Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4083 Complete the chart. You may use a dictionary if necessary.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 * 0 # M2M2 C 1 GHI PQRS Sentences Have Perfect Punctuation A sentence is an independent clause that expresses a complete thought. It starts with a capital letter and ends with a terminal punctuation mark (a period, a question mark, or an exclamation mark). We bought peaches and made peach cobbler for dessert. Turn left at the next corner. (The subject You is understood in a command.) Sentence Fragments Have Too Much Punctuation A sentence fragment starts with a capital letter and ends with a terminal punctuation mark, but it does not state a complete thought. You read it, realize something is missing, and say, “Huh?” A fragment can often be repaired by adding it to the sentence before or after it. If you think that’s bad. (Note how the fragment leaves you hanging.) Wait until you hear what happened next! Fixed: If you think that’s bad, wait until you hear what happened next! Ninety percent of American adults. Own cell phones. Which is almost everyone. Fixed: Ninety percent of American adults own cell phones, which is almost everyone. Run-ons Sentences Have Wrong or Too Little Punctuation A run-on sentence consists of two independent clauses that are not joined by a conjunction or a semicolon. A comma splice is the most common kind of run-on sentence. It happens when a comma is used to join two sentences together without a conjunction. A run-on can often be repaired by changing the comma to a semicolon or by adding a conjunction. More than 100 people applied for the position, only three were interviewed. Fixed: More than 100 people applied for the position, but only three were interviewed. The Thanksgiving Day football game has been rescheduled to Saturday Hector can’t go. Fixed: The Thanksgiving Day football game has been rescheduled to Saturday; therefore, Hector can’t go. Sentences: Fragments, Complete & Run-on Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4084
Read each item. Identify it as a complete sentence (C), a fragment (F), or a run-on (R). Write the appropriate letter on the line. _____ 1. Where is it? _____ 2. If you’d like. _____ 3. He cried all the way home I think he was afraid. _____ 4. My best friend Madison moved to Buffalo I really miss her. _____ 5. Behind the barn. _____ 6. There was a warm, gentle breeze. _____ 7. Tim failed because the test was difficult, he hadn’t studied. _____ 8. The three people on the raft. _____ 9. Sunburned by the hot sun. _____ 10. Last weekend my dad bought me a puppy. _____ 11. Emily asked Tony if he knew where her pen was. _____ 12. Clay delivers newspapers with his bike, his route is on Maple Street. Arrival 10:00 am Speed Turn right on Hedgehog Lane 35 mph AG Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4084 Sentences: Fragments, Complete & Run-on
STOP Here are some rules to help you spell words correctly. Write i before e except right after c or when it sounds like a as in neighbor and weigh: briefly beige conceive friendship This rule works most of the time; however, there are exceptions such as glacier, deity, either, and foreign. In a compound noun, add an s to the the most important part of the word to form the plural: 1 passerby, 2 passersby 1 brother-in-law, 2 brothers-in-law Nouns that end in a consonant y change to ie when adding the s to make the word plural: 1 country, 2 countries 1 penny, 2 pennies 1 fly, 2 flies This rule also works for verbs ending in consonant y and adding the -s or -ed to form a tense: bury, buries, buried marry, marries, married This rule also works for adjectives and adverbs ending in consonant y when adding –ier or –iest : lazy, lazier, laziest silly, sillier, silliest healthy, healthier, healthiest Verbs that end in e drop it before adding –ed or –ing : advise = advised, advising sneeze = sneezed, sneezing Verbs that end in ie change to y before adding the –ing : die = dying lie = lying tie = tying When one-syllable verbs end in a consonant, you usually double the final consonant before adding –ing , and if it’s a multi-syllable word you don’t: stop = stopping travel = traveling benefit = benefiting 1-syllable 2-syllable 3-syllable This rule works most of the time; however, there are exceptions such as fixing, admitting, and propelling. Spelling Guidelines Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4085
Circle the correct spelling for each word. 1. The dining room furniture is being shipped to us via (freight, frieght) truck. 2. After marrying Tammy, Gary had three (sister-in-laws, sisters-in-law). 3. When the crowd (thined, thinned), I was able to see the emergency vehicle. 4. Today is the (chilliest, chillyest) day of the entire winter so far. 5. My doctor is (refering, referring) me to an ear, nose, and throat specialist. 6. The orange crate is (heavier, heavyer) than the red one. 7. Beverly is the most (conceited, concieted) girl in our class. 8. The two (secretary of states, secretaries of state) met in Oslo, Norway. 9. There are about 20 teenagers in Bianca’s (neighborhood, nieghborhood). 10. We were shocked that the ambassador had acted in such a (deceitful, decietful) manner. 11. Mom bought six (guppys, guppies) from the pet store. 12. Darren (studyed, studied) three hours for the final exam. AMBULANCE SERVICE Spelling Guidelines Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4085
Nonfiction text includes features to help the reader. Illustrations help the reader to envision what is written in the text. A caption is a pithy description for the illustration. An asterisk after a word tells the reader to look to the bottom of the page for an explanatory footnote. A sidebar is information that is relevant to the topic but is set aside in its own box. Generally a sidebar is interesting data that couldn’t be worked into the body of the text. As you read the passage below, note the two illustrations, two captions, the explanatory footnote, and the sidebar. James Garfield, 20th President of the United States President James Garfield had the second shortest presidency in U.S. history. He served just 199 days in 1881. Even so, during that time, he uncovered corruption in the post office, chose a U.S. Supreme Court judge, and appointed black Americans to important