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Exploring Nature: Classification of Living Things

Life Science - Middle School

 
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Copyright © NewPath Learning. All rights reserved. www.newpathlearning.com Charts Charts 34-6302 Exploring Nature Exploring Nature Classification Classification of Living Things of Living Things \|xiBAHBDy01405ozX Sturdy, Free-Standing Design, Perfect for Learning Centers! Reverse Side Features Questions, Labeling Exercises & more! From Sheri Amsel, Award Winning Naturalist, Author & Illustrator!
Phone: 800-507-0966 Fax: 800-507-0967 www.newpathlearning.com NewPath Learning® products are developed by teachers using research-based principles and are classroom tested. The company’s product line consists of an array of proprietary curriculum review games, workbooks, charts, posters, visual learning guides, interactive whiteboard software and other teaching resources. All products are supplemented with web-based activities, assessments and content to provide an engaging means of educating students on key, curriculum-based topics correlated to applicable state and national education standards. Copyright © 2011 NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Curriculum Mastery® and NewPath Learning® are registered trademarks of NewPath Learning LLC. Science Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts provide comprehensive coverage of key standards-based curriculum in an illustrated format that is visually appealing, engaging and easy to use. Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts can be used with the entire classroom, with small groups or by students working independently. Each Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart Set features 10 double-sided laminated charts covering grade-level specific curriculum content on one side plus write-on/wipe-off charts on the reverse side for student use or for small-group instruction Built-in sturdy free-standing easel for easy display Spiral-bound for ease of use Activity Guide with black-line masters of the charts for students to fill-in, key vocabulary terms, corresponding quiz questions for each chart, along with answers Ideal for Learning centers In-class instruction for interactive presentations and demonstrations Hands-on student use Stand-alone reference for review of key science concepts Teaching resource to supplement any program HOW TO USE Classroom Use Each Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart can be used to graphically introduce or review a topic of interest. Side 1 of each Flip Chart provides graphical representation of key concepts in a concise, grade appropriate reading level for instructing students. The reverse Side 2 of each Flip Chart allows teachers or students to fill in the call-outs of key structures and summarize key concepts. Note: Be sure to use an appropriate dry-erase marker and to test it on a small section of the chart prior to using it. The Activity Guide included provides a black-line master of each Flip Chart which students can use to fill in before, during or after instruction. On the reverse side of each black-line master are questions corresponding to each Flip Chart topic which can be used as further review or as a means of assessment. While the activities in the guide can be used in conjunction with the Flip Charts, they can also be used individually for review or as a form of assessment or in conjunction with any other related assignment. Learning Centers Each Flip Chart provides students with a quick illustrated view of grade-appropriate curriculum concepts. Students may use these Flip Charts in small group settings along with the corresponding activity pages contained in the guide to learn or review concepts already covered in class. Students may also use these charts as reference while playing NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Independent Student Use Students can use the hands-on Flip Charts to practice and learn independently by first studying Side 1 of the chart and then using Side 2 of the chart or the corresponding graphical activities contained in the guide to fill in the answers and assess their understanding. Reference/Teaching Resource Curriculum Mastery® Charts are a great visual supplement to any curriculum or they can be used in conjunction with NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Chart # 1: Chart # 2: Chart # 3: Chart # 4: Chart # 5: Chart # 6: Chart # 7: Chart # 8: Chart # 9: Chart #10: Classification of Living Things The Animal Kingdom Mammals: Class Mammalia Amphibians: Class Amphibia Reptiles: Class Reptilia Insects: Class Insecta Birds: Class Aves Arachnids: Class Arachnida Sharks and Rays: Class Chondrichthyes Bony Ray-Finned Fish Exploring Nature EExploring xploring Nature ature
To help understand living things, scientists break them down into groups by their traits. This is called biological classification. Presently, there are eight levels of groups: Domain, Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, Species. New discoveries in genetics may cause some regrouping of organisms and their classification over time. The three Domains ( Archaea, Eubacteria and Eukaryota) are the highest level of classification to date. They include all known living things on Earth. The Eubacteria Domain is made up of bacteria, which are single-celled living things also known as microorganisms. They are prokaryotes, lacking cell nuclei and organelles. Bacteria are found everywhere on Earth, from the soil under our feet to inside our bodies. They can cause many human illnesses, but are also vital to life on Earth. The study of microorganisms is called microbiology. The Archaea Domain also has single-celled microorganisms (prokaryotes); however, archeons can survive extreme conditions like scalding hotsprings and very salty areas. A relatively recent discovery, this domain is still being studied and updated. The Eukaryota Domain has more complex organisms with cells that have a nucleus and organelles. They are eukaryotes. This domain is currently divided into four Kingdoms: Protista, Fungi, Plantae, Animalia. The Protista Kingdom is a diverse group, including plant-like algae, animal-like protozoans and fungi-like slime molds. The Fungi Kingdom includes mushrooms, yeasts and molds. They are important detritivores, which break down dead organisms and recycle nutrients back into the environment. They can also cause problems when they invade an organism as a fungal infection, like athlete’s foot. They are extremely important to humans, as the source of penicillin, which kills bacteria, and the source of yeast, which drives useful processes like fermentation and rising bread. The Plant Kingdom includes trees, shrubs, flowers, grasses, ferns and mosses. This group is essential to all life on Earth, because they can make their own food using sunlight through the process of photosynthesis. Plants are the primary producers which feed all animal life, including us. They also absorb carbon dioxide and produce life-giving oxygen. The Animal Kingdom includes nine groups or Phyla (plural of phylum): Annelida - segmented worms Nematoda - round worms Platyhelminthes - flat worms Arthropoda - insects, spiders Porifera - sponges Cnidaria - coral, jellyfish Echinodermata - starfish, sea urchins Mollusca - snails, slugs, clams, squid, octopi Chordata - mammals, birds, reptiles, fish, amphibians Classification of Living Things
94-4021 Classification of Living Things To help understand living things, scientists break them down into groups by their traits. This is called biological classification. Presently, there are eight levels of groups: Domain, Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, Species. New discoveries in genetics may cause some regrouping of organisms and their classification over time. The three Domains ( Archaea, Eubacteria and Eukaryota) are the highest level of classification to date. They include all known living things on Earth. The Eubacteria Domain is made up of ______________________________ which are single-celled living things, also known as microorganisms. They are prokaryotes, lacking cell nuclei and organelles. Bacteria are found everywhere on Earth from the soil under our feet to inside our bodies. They can cause many human illnesses, but are also vital to life on Earth. The study of microorganisms is called microbiology. The Archaea Domain also has ___________________-celled microorganisms (prokaryotes); however, archeons can survive extreme conditions. The Eukaryota Domain has more complex organisms with cells that have a __________________________ and organelles. This domain is currently divided into four Kingdoms: Protista, Fungi, Plantae, Animalia. The ______________________ Kingdom is a diverse group, including plant-like _____________________ animal-like protozoans and fungi-like slime molds. The Fungi Kingdom has mushrooms, _______________________ and _______________________. They are detritivores, which break down _______________ organisms and recycle nutrients back into the environment. They are extremely important to humans, as the source of _______________________, which kills bacteria, and the source of yeast, which drives useful processes like fermentation and rising bread. The Plant Kingdom includes trees, shrubs, flowers, grasses, ferns and mosses. This group is essential to all life on Earth, because they can make their own food, using sunlight through the process of ________________________________. Plants are the primary producers which feed all animal life, including us. They also absorb ___________________________ and produce life-giving ____________________. The Animal Kingdom includes nine groups or Phyla: Annelida - segmented ______________ Nematoda - round ______________ Platyhelminthes - ____________ worms Arthropoda - _______________, spiders Porifera - _________________ Cnidaria - coral, __________________ Echinodermata - __________________, sea urchins Mollusca - _____________, _____________, ______________, squid, octopi Chordata - ____________________, ______________, ______________, __________, amphibians
Classification of the Animal Kingdom is broken down into nine groups or Phyla: 1) Annelida: segmented worms, 2) Nematoda: round worms, 3) Platyhelminthes: flat worms, 4) Arthropoda: insects, spiders, crabs and lobsters, barnacles, horseshoe crabs, centipedes, millipedes, 5) Porifera: sponges, 6) Echinodermata: starfish, sea urchins and sand dollars, 7) Cnidaria: jellyfish, coral and sea anemones, 8) Mollusca: snails and slugs, clams and oysters, octopi and squid, and 9) Chordata: mammals, birds, reptiles, fish, amphibians, sharks and rays. Each Phyla is, in turn, broken down into many Classes and each Class into Orders. Each Order is broken down into Families, then Genus and Species. The Animal Kingdom chart below shows the nine animal Phyla with special attention to the Phylum Chordata and its Subphylum Vertebrata - animals with backbones. (Subphyla are smaller groups below Phyla sorting out the complex Phyla.) Vertebrata includes animals with backbones. From the Phylum Chordata down, each level only shows the most well-known groups. To identify one living thing, you use its Genus name and its Species name. For instance, the gray wolf is Canis lupus. Canis is its Genus and lupus is its Species. Note that the Genus name is always capitalized, but the Species name is not. Follow the classification line for the wolf below: Phylum - Chordata, Subphylum - Vertebrata, Class - Mammal, Order - Carnivora, Family - Canidae, Genus - Canis, Species - Lupus. To help remember the classification order, people use a funny saying: King Phillip Came Over From Germany Saturday. Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus and Species. Animal Phyla Arthropoda Platyhelminthes (Flat Worms) Chordata Porifera (Sponges) Echinodermata (Starfish & Sea Urchins) Cnidaria (Coral & Jellyfish) Annelida (Segmented Worms) Nematoda (Round Worms) Mollusca (Snails, Clams & Octopi) Crustaceans Myriapoda Vertebrata Chelicerates Crabs Lobsters Shrimp Barnacles Insects Centipedes Millipedes Starfish Sand Dollars Horseshoe Crabs Spiders Scorpions Sea Urchins Jellyfish Anemones Coral Oysters Clams Snails Slugs Periwinkles Squid Octopi Reptiles Birds Mammals Bony Fish Cartilaginous Fish Lampreys Class Amphibians Hagfish Primates Edentata Carnivora Cetacea Artiodactyla Perissodactyla Lagomorph Rodentia Order (primates) (toothless mammals) (carnivores) (whales and dolphins) (even-toed hooved) (odd-toed hooved) (rabbits, hares, pikas) (rodents) Family Ursidae (bears) Procyonidae (raccoons) Canidae (dogs) Mustelidae (weasel family) Mephitidae (skunks) Otariidae & Phocidae (sea lions and seals) Felidae (cats) Species Canis lupus (gray wolf) Genus Vulpes (red, arctic & kit fox) Canis (wolf, coyote & dingo) The Animal Kingdom
94-4022 Classification of the Animalia Kingdom is broken down into nine groups or Phyla: 1) Annelida: segmented ________________, 2) Nematoda: round worms, 3) Platyhelminthes: flat worms, 4) Arthropoda: insects, spiders, crabs and lobsters, barnacles, horseshoe crabs, centipedes and millipedes, 5) Porifera: ______________________, 6) Echinodermata: starfish, sea urchins and sand dollars, 7) Cnidaria: jellyfish, coral and sea anemones, 8) Mollusca: snails and slugs, clams and oysters, ___________________________ and squid, and 9) Chordata: mammals, birds, reptiles, fish, amphibians, sharks and rays. Each Phyla is, in turn, broken down into many Classes and each Class into Orders. Each Order is broken down into Families, then Genus and Species. The Animal Kingdom chart below shows the nine animal Phyla with special attention to the Phylum Chordata and its Subphylum Vertebrata - animals with _____________________________. From the Phylum Chordata down, each level only shows the most well-known groups. To identify one living thing, you use its Genus name and its Species name. For instance, the gray wolf is Canis lupus. Canis is its Genus and lupus is its Species. Note that the Genus name is always capitalized, but the species name is not. Follow the classification line for the wolf below: Phylum - ________________________, Subphylum - _______________________, Class - _________________________, Order - _________________________, Family - ________________________, Genus - Canis, Species - Lupus. To help remember the classification order, people use a funny saying: King Phillip Came Over From Germany Saturday. Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus and Species. Animal Phyla Arthropoda Platyhelminthes (Flat Worms) Chordata Porifera (Sponges) Echinodermata (Starfish & Sea Urchins) Cnidaria (Coral & Jellyfish) Annelida (Segmented Worms) Nematoda (Round Worms) Mollusca (Snails, Clams & Octopi) Crustaceans Myriapoda Vertebrata Chelicerates Crabs Lobsters Shrimp Barnacles Insects Centipedes Millipedes Starfish Sand Dollars Horseshoe Crabs Spiders Scorpions Sea Urchins Jellyfish Anemones Coral Oysters Clams Snails Slugs Periwinkles Squid Octopi Reptiles Birds Mammals Bony Fish Cartilaginous Fish Lampreys Class Amphibians Hagfish Primates Edentata Carnivora Cetacea Artiodactyla Perissodactyla Lagomorph Rodentia Order (primates) (toothless mammals) (carnivores) (whales and dolphins) (even-toed hooved) (odd-toed hooved) (rabbits, hares, pikas) (rodents) Family Ursidae (bears) Procyonidae (raccoons) Canidae (dogs) Mustelidae (weasel family) Mephitidae (skunks) Otariidae & Phocidae (sea lions and seals) Felidae (cats) Species Canis lupus (gray wolf) Genus Vulpes (red, arctic & kit fox) Canis (wolf, coyote & dingo) The Animal Kingdom
ClassMammalia Subclass Prototheria SubclassTheria egg-layingmonotremes live-birthmammals InfraclassMetatheria InfraclassEutheria pouchedmarsupials placentalmammals Orders Carnivora Pinnipedia Cetacea Sirenia meat-eaters seals,sealions,walruses whales,dolphins dugongs,manatees Edentata Proboscidea Artiodactyla Perissodactyla toothlessmammals: elephantseven-toedhooved odd-toedhooved armadillos,sloths, mammalsmammals hairyanteaters Mammals - Class Mammalia AnimalsintheClass Mammalialiveineveryhabitatfromthedeserttothearctictothedeepocean.Somemammalsareactive duringtheday( diurnal)andsomeareactiveatnight(nocturnal).Theylivealone(solitary)oringreatherds(gregarious).They eatmeat( carnivores),orplants(herbivores),orboth(omnivores).Mammalsareallshapesandsizes,rangingfromthepygmy shrewat1 /10ofanouncetothebluewhaleatmorethan300,000pounds.Yettheyallshareafewphysical traits. 1) Mammalsare covered with body hair (exceptmarinemammalslikedolphinsandwhales).Hairkeepsmammalswarmand protectsthemfromsunburnandscratches.Ithasbeenadaptedasaprotectivetoollikethespinesonaporcupine,orisusedto feel,likewhiskersonacat. 2)Mammalshavethree middle ear bones (malleus,incusandstapes)thatgreatlyimprovehearing. 3)Femalemammalsmake milk to feed their young.Themilk,whichisfulloffatandprotein,helpsthemgrow,developand survivetoadulthood. 4)Mothers(andsometimesfathers) protect their young from predators.Evenafternursingiscomplete, parentsoftenlivewiththeiroffspringandteachthemtohunt,survivepredationandliveinasocialgroup. 5)Mammalsare warm-blooded.Becausemammalsaresodiverse,theirgroupinghaschangedinrecentyears.ASubclass(Prototheria)was createdfortheegg-layingmammalsliketheduck-billedplatypus.Theothermammalsinthe SubclassTheriaweresplitintotwo Infraclasses–oneforpouchedmarsupials ( Metatheria)andtheother(Eutheria)forplacentalmammalswhogrowtheiryoung insideuntilbirth(likehumans).The Eutheria infraclassisbrokendownintomanysmallergroupscalledOrders.Tounderstand howweclassifythegroupsofmammals,studytheillustratedchartbelow. Primates apes,monkeys, lemurs,people Insectivora insect-eaters:moles, hedgehogs,shrews Chiroptera bats Pholidota pangolins Lagomorpha rabbits,hares, pikas Dermoptera colugosor flyinglemurs Rodentia gnawingmammals
ClassMammalia Subclass Prototheria SubclassTheria egg-layingmonotremes live-birthmammals InfraclassMetatheria InfraclassEutheria pouchedmarsupials placentalmammals Orders Carnivora Pinnipedia Cetacea Sirenia meat-eaters seals,sealions,walruses whales,dolphins dugongs,manatees Edentata Proboscidea Artiodactyla Perissodactyla toothlessmammals: elephantseven-toedhooved odd-toedhooved armadillos,sloths, mammalsmammals hairyanteaters Primates apes,monkeys, lemurs,people Insectivora insect-eaters:moles, hedgehogs,shrews Chiroptera bats Pholidota pangolins Lagomorpha rabbits,hares, pikas Dermoptera colugosor flyinglemurs Rodentia gnawingmammals 94-4023 Somemammalsareactiveduringtheday( diurnal)andsomeareactiveat_________________(nocturnal).They livealone( solitary)oringreatherds(gregarious).Theyeatmeat(________________________),orplants ( ________________________),orboth(________________________).1)Mammalsarecovered with body __________________ (exceptmarinemammalslikedolphinsandwhales). 2)Mammalshavethree middle ear bones (malleus,incusandstapes)thatgreatlyimprovehearing. 3)Femalemammalsmake _________________ to feed their young.Themilkisfulloffatandproteintohelpthemgrow,developandsurvivetoadulthood.4)Mothers(and sometimesfathers) protect young from predators.Parentsoftenlivewiththeiroffspringandteachthemtohunt,survive predationandliveinasocialgroup. 5)Mammalsare________________-blooded.Becausemammalsaresodiverse, theirgroupinghaschangedinrecentyears.A Subclasswascreatedfortheegg-layingmammalsliketheduck-billed platypus.Theothermammalsinthe Subclass TheriaweresplitintotwoInfraclasses–oneforpouchedmammalscallled _________________________ andtheotherfor ________________________mammalswhogrowtheiryounginsideuntil birth(likehumans).Thesemammalsarethenclassifiedinmanysmallergroupscalled Orders. Mammals - Class Mammalia
Amphibians - Class Amphibia Animals in the Class Amphibia all share some common traits. 1) They lay their eggs in water. 2) Newly hatched young breathe through gills. 3) As amphibians grow, their body changes, growing legs and developing lungs for life on land. 4) As adults, most amphibans are never far from water where they return in the spring to mate and lay eggs. 5) Amphibians are cold-blooded. In cold climates they spend the winter months in a deep sleep, called torpor, buried in the mud or leaf litter. The Class Amphibia is broken down into three groups called Orders: 1) Salamanders and Newts keep their tails as adults and grow legs made for walking. All four of their legs are about the same size. 2) Frogs and Toads change completely as they grow from tadpoles to adults, losing their tail and growing legs. Their back legs are designed for jumping and are bigger than their front legs. 3) Gymnophiona are worm-like amphibians with no legs. They live in tropical climates and are not found in North America. North American wetlands are home for many amphibian species, including Salamanders and Newts and Frogs and Toads. See if you can identify the amphibians in the northern wetland illustration below. 1. two-lined salamander larva 2. two-lined salamander 3. newt larva 4. frog eggs and hatching tadpoles 5. bullfrog tadpoles 6. bullfrog 6 2 8 7 1 5 4 3 7. pickerel frog 8. spring peeper
94-4024 Amphibians: 1) They lay their _____________ in water. 2) Newly hatched young breathe through _______________. 3) As they grow, their body changes, growing ____________ and developing lungs for life on land. 4) As adults, most amphibans are never far from water, where they return in the spring to mate and lay eggs. 5) Amphibians are ________________-blooded. In cold climates they spend the winter months in a deep sleep, called ___________________, buried in the mud or leaf litter. Orders: 1) Salamanders and Newts keep their tails as adults and grow legs made for walking. All four of their legs are about the same size. 2) Frogs and Toads change completely as they grow from _______________________ to adults, losing their tail and growing legs. Their back legs are designed for ________________________ and are bigger than their front legs. 3) Gymnophiona are _______________________ amphibians with no legs. They live in tropical climates and are not found in North America. See if you can identify the amphibians in the North American wetland illustration below. 1. _____________________________________________ 2. _____________________________________________ 3. _____________________________________________ 4. _____________________________________________ 5. _____________________________________________ 6. _____________________________________________ 7. _____________________________________________ 8. _____________________________________________ 6 2 8 7 1 5 4 3 Amphibians - Class Amphibia
Reptiles - Class Reptilia Animals in the Class Reptilia include turtles, snakes, alligators and lizards. All reptiles share the following physical traits: 1) They lay eggs on land. A leathery shell protects the eggs from drying out. 2) They are covered with tough, dry skin and protective scales or plates. 3) They are cold-blooded. 4) Their teeth are about the same shape and size throughout their mouth. The Class Reptilia is broken down into four groups called Orders: Crocodiles (1), caimans, alligators (2) and gharials have long, flattened heads and bodies with legs coming off the sides, tough body armor made of scales, and a long, powerful tail. Their eyes and nostrils sit on top of their head, allowing them to stalk prey while being almost completely hidden under the water. Turtles, terrapins, sliders and tortoises vary in shape, size and habitat, from desert tortoises (3) to wetland painted (4) and snapping turtles (5) to ocean sea turtles (6). They all have one thing in common - a shell. This amazing structure is fused to the backbone and ribcage, surrounding and protecting the vital organs. Lizards and snakes are broken down into two Suborders. They have scale-like skin and a moveable upper jaw that lets them open their mouths very wide for big prey. a. Lizards differ from snakes in two ways they have legs and ears. They vary in size, from tiny anoles (7) to the massive komodo dragon (8), with lizards (9) and chameleons (10) all sizes in between. b. Snakes have elongated bodies and no legs, eyelids or external ears. They include rattlesnakes (11), vipers (12), cobras (13), garter (14) and milk snakes (15), and many other families. Tuataras (16) are lizard-like animals only found in New Zealand and the surrounding islands. They have a double row of teeth on their upper jaw. 4 1 3 5 8 9 6 7 10 11 13 12 16 15 14 2
94-4025 1) Reptiles lay _______________ on land. A leathery shell protects the eggs from drying out. 2) Reptiles are covered with tough, dry skin and protective __________________________ or plates. 3) They are _________________-blooded. 4) Their teeth are about the same shape and size throughout their mouth. The Class Reptilia is broken down into four groups called Orders. Crocodiles (1), caimans, alligators (2) and gharials have long, flattened heads and bodies with legs coming off the sides, tough body armor made of scales, and a long, powerful __________________. Their eyes and nostrils sit on top of their head, allowing them to stalk prey while being almost completely hidden under the _____________________. Turtles, terrapins, sliders and tortoises vary in shape, size and habitat, from desert tortoises (3) to wetland painted (4) and snapping turtles (5) to ocean _________________________ (6). They all have one thing in common - a shell. This amazing structure is fused to the backbone and ribcage, surrounding and protecting the vital organs. Lizards and snakes have scale-like skin and a moveable upper _______________ that lets them open their mouths very wide for big prey. a. Lizards differ from snakes in two ways they have ______________ and ears. They vary in size from tiny anoles (7) to the massive komodo ________________________ (8), with lizards (9) and ________________________________ (10) all sizes in between. b. Snakes have elongated bodies and no ___________, eyelids or external ears. They include rattlesnakes (11), _____________________ (12), _____________________ (13), garter (14) and milk snakes (15), and many other families. Tuataras (16) are lizard-like animals only found in New Zealand and the surrounding islands. They have a double row of ___________________ on their upper jaw. 4 1 3 5 8 9 6 7 10 11 13 12 16 15 14 2 Reptiles - Class Reptilia
Insects are in the Class Insecta which is broken down into about 30 groups or Orders. True insects all share some traits that can be seen when they are adults. They have three body parts (head, thorax and abdomen), one pair of antennae, two pairs of wings and three pairs of legs. They often have large, compound eyes and mouth parts that bite, suck, pierce, sip or rasp. There are more than 900,000 known species so far, making them the majority of animal species on Earth. Insects grow up in one of two ways. Some undergo incomplete metamorphosis. This is when the young hatch and look like miniature adults, called nymphs. As they grow, they shed their hard outer layer called an exoskeleton. Each new size is called an instar. Insects like grasshoppers and crickets grow this way. Most insects, however, go through a complete metamorphosis. This is when the new hatchlings, called larvae, look completely different from the adults. They feed until they reach a certain size and then form a protective cocoon or chrysalis and begin to change or pupate. During pupation their bodies break down and change into their adult forms. Insects like moths and butterflies grow this way. Their pupae are called caterpillars. The classification of insects is: Kingdom - Animalia, Phylum - Arthropoda, Subphylum - Crustacean, Class - Insecta, Orders (10 common): Insects - Class Insecta 1) Coleoptera (Beetles) 2) Dermaptera (Earwigs) 3) Dictyoptera (Mantids and Cockroaches) 4) Diptera (True Flies) 5) Ephemeroptera (Mayflies) 6) Hymenoptera (Bees, Wasps, Ants) 7) Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths) 8) Odonata (Dragonflies and Damselflies) 9) Orthoptera (Grasshoppers, Katydids and Crickets) 10) Phasmida (Stick Insects) 4 1 3 5 10 6 7 2 6 1 7 7 6 9 9 9 8 8 1 4
94-4026 Insects - Class Insecta Insects have three body parts (head, thorax and ____________________________), one pair of antennae, two pairs of _________________ and three pairs of ___________. Insects grow up in one of two ways. Some undergo incomplete ______________________________. This is when the young hatch and look like miniature adults, called __________________. As they grow, they shed their hard outer layer called an ______________________________. Each new size is called an instar. Insects like grasshoppers and crickets grow this way. Most insects, however, go through a complete metamorphosis. This is when the new hatchlings, called ____________________, look completely different from the adults. They feed until they reach a certain size and then form a protective __________________________ or ____________________________ and begin to change or ________________________. During pupation their bodies break down and change into their adult forms. Insects like moths and butterflies grow this way. Their _____________ are called caterpillars. The classification of insects is: Kingdom - Animalia, Phylum -Arthropoda, Subphylum - Crustacean, Class - Insecta, Orders (10 common): 1) ____________________________________ 2) ____________________________________ 3) ____________________________________ 4) ____________________________________ 5) ____________________________________ 6) ____________________________________ 7) ____________________________________ 4 1 3 5 10 6 7 2 6 1 7 7 6 9 9 9 8 8 1 4 8) ____________________________________ 9) ____________________________________ 10) ____________________________________
Birds - Class Aves Birds are in the Class Aves and come in all shapes and sizes from hummingbirds weighing less than 1 /10 of an ounce to 200-pound ostriches. All birds have some important traits in common.