Curriculum Resources
Take learning to the next level and transform the way you teach with a vast library of ready-to-use, standards-aligned, adaptable curriculum resources. The resources listed below are either available with an Online Learning Subscription which allows you to instruct, assess and track student performance or as individual hands-on classroom resources which can be purchased. Choose from Multimedia Lessons, Curriculum Mastery Games, Flip Charts, Visual Learning Guides, Flash Cards, Vocabulary Cards, and Curriculum Modules available on our online store.
  • Select By Standard
  • Curriculum Resources
    • General Science
    • Life Science / Biology
    • Human Body
    • Earth Science
    • Physical Science
    • Chemistry
    • Math
    • Language Arts
    • Social Studies
 
FREE Trial to
Online Learning
Shop for printed
Flip Charts

Exploring Nature: Earth's Ocean

Life Science - Middle School

 
1
/
22
Copyright © NewPath Learning. All rights reserved. www.newpathlearning.com Charts Charts 34-6306 Exploring Nature Exploring Nature Earth’s Oceans Earth’s Oceans \|xiBAHBDy01409mzV Sturdy, Free-Standing Design, Perfect for Learning Centers! Reverse Side Features Questions, Labeling Exercises, Vocabulary Review & more! From Sheri Amsel, Award Winning Naturalist, Author & Illustrator!
Phone: 800-507-0966 Fax: 800-507-0967 www.newpathlearning.com NewPath Learning® products are developed by teachers using research-based principles and are classroom tested. The company’s product line consists of an array of proprietary curriculum review games, workbooks, charts, posters, visual learning guides, interactive whiteboard software and other teaching resources. All products are supplemented with web-based activities, assessments and content to provide an engaging means of educating students on key, curriculum-based topics correlated to applicable state and national education standards. Copyright © 2011 NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Curriculum Mastery® and NewPath Learning® are registered trademarks of NewPath Learning LLC. Science Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts provide comprehensive coverage of key standards-based curriculum in an illustrated format that is visually appealing, engaging and easy to use. Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts can be used with the entire classroom, with small groups or by students working independently. Each Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart Set features 10 double-sided laminated charts covering grade-level specific curriculum content on one side plus write-on/wipe-off charts on the reverse side for student use or for small-group instruction. Built-in sturdy free-standing easel for easy display Spiral bound for ease of use Activity Guide with black-line masters of the charts for students to fill-in, key vocabulary terms, corresponding quiz questions for each chart, along with answers Ideal for Learning centers In-class instruction for interactive presentations and demonstrations Hands-on student use Stand-alone reference for review of key science concepts Teaching resource to supplement any program HOW TO USE Classroom Use Each Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart can be used to graphically introduce or review a topic of interest. Side 1 of each Flip Chart provides graphical representation of key concepts in a concise, grade appropriate reading level for instructing students. The reverse Side 2 of each Flip Chart allows teachers or students to fill in the call-outs of key structures and summarize key concepts. Note: Be sure to use an appropriate dry-erase marker and to test it on a small section of the chart prior to using it. The Activity Guide included provides a black-line master of each Flip Chart which students can use to fill in before, during or after instruction. On the reverse side of each black-line master are questions corresponding to each Flip Chart topic which can be used as further review or as a means of assessment. While the activities in the guide can be used in conjunction with the Flip Charts, they can also be used individually for review or as a form of assessment or in conjunction with any other related assignment. Learning Centers Each Flip Chart provides students with a quick illustrated view of grade-appropriate curriculum concepts. Students may use these Flip Charts in small group settings along with the corresponding activity pages contained in the guide to learn or review concepts already covered in class. Students may also use these charts as reference while playing NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Independent Student Use Students can use the hands-on Flip Charts to practice and learn independently by first studying Side 1 of the chart and then using Side 2 of the chart or the corresponding graphical activities contained in the guide to fill in the answers and assess their understanding. Reference/Teaching Resource Curriculum Mastery® Charts are a great visual supplement to any curriculum or they can be used in conjunction with NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Chart # 1: Chart # 2: Chart # 3: Chart # 4: Chart # 5: Chart # 6: Chart # 7: Chart # 8: Chart # 9: Chart #10: Ocean Life Zones The Intertidal Zone Mangrove Swamp Coral Reefs The Everglades Marine Mammals Sharks! Ocean Invertebrates Ocean Birds Ocean Ecology Exploring Nature EExploring xploring Nature ature
Ocean Life Zones Open Coastal Sea Zone Life Zones of the Ocean: The oceans cover almost 75% of the earth. They can be divided into the coastal zone - shallow, warmer waters along the coasts, full of nutrient-rich materials, and the open sea - the rest of the ocean away from land. Vertical Ocean Life Zones: The ocean is also divided into zones from top to bottom. In the top layer sunlight reaches 650 feet (200m). This is the photic zone. The deeper, dimly lit bathyal zone reaches down to 3,300 feet (1,000m). Deeper still, the cold, dark abyssal zone reaches the ocean floor at 13,000 feet (4,000m) or deeper. Microscopic phytoplankton and zooplankton make up the bottom of the ocean’s food web. Abyssal Zone: has pressure that increases as you descend deeper. Only some animals, like the sperm whale and giant squid, can survive the great pressure here. By the time you reach the ocean floor, only creatures like squid, worms and sea stars remain to feed on the falling debris and nutrients. Photic Zone: has light and many fish, whales, dolphins and sharks. Bathyal Zone: has very little light, but many animals live here, including bioluminescent animals that make their own light. Amsel Bathyal Zone Abyssal Zone Photic Zone Intertidal Zones in the Coastal Zone Splash Zone Low Tide Zone Middle Tide Zone High Tide Zone Low Tide Zone: Mostly underwater. Middle Tide Zone: Half the time underwater and half in open air. High Tide Zone: Underwater only when the tide is high. Splash Zone: Dry but for spray.
94-4061 Ocean Life Zones Intertidal Zones in the Coastal Zone Life Zones of the Ocean: The oceans cover almost 75% of the earth. They can be divided into the _______________________ zone - shallow, warmer waters along the coasts, full of nutrient-rich materials and the _______________________ sea - the rest of the ocean away from land. Vertical Ocean Life Zones: The ocean is also divided into zones from top to bottom. In the top layer sunlight reaches 650 feet (200m). This is the _____________________ zone. The deeper, dimly lit bathyal zone reaches down to 3,300 feet (1,000m). Deeper still, the cold, _____________________ abyssal zone reaches the ocean floor at 13,000 feet (4,000m) or deeper. Microscopic phytoplankton and zooplankton make up the bottom of the ocean’s food web. Splash Zone Low Tide Zone Middle Tide Zone High Tide Zone Abyssal Zone: has pressure that increases as you descend deeper. Only some animals, like the ________________ whale and giant ________________, can survive the great pressure here. By the time you reach the ocean floor, only creatures like squid, worms and sea stars remain to feed on the falling debris and nutrients. Photic Zone: has ___________________ and many fish, whales, dolphins and sharks. Bathyal Zone: has very little light, but many animals live here, including ____________________________ animals that make their own light. Low Tide Zone: Mostly underwater. Middle Tide Zone: Half the time underwater and half in open air. High Tide Zone: Underwater only when the tide is high. Splash Zone: Dry but for spray. Amsel Bathyal Zone Abyssal Zone Photic Zone Open Coastal Sea Zone
The Intertidal Zone The intertidal zone ecosytem is generally broken down into four areas. The Spray Zone (or Supratidal Zone) is above the tide zone. This zone is high up on the beach above where even the high tide reaches. It does get sprayed by big waves and flooded during storms and unusually high tides. Not much wildlife or plant life survives here. It is like a desert. You can sometimes find some small barnacles and marine lichen. The High Tide Zone (or Upper Mid-littoral Zone) is underwater only when the tide is high. It is a very salty area. Small pools are left behind when the tide goes out, and they evaporate leaving the salt to collect. You can find sea anemones, crabs, starfish, snails, limpets, barnacles and mussels. The Middle Tide Zone (or Lower Mid-littoral Zone) spends half its time under water and half its time in the open air. This zone gets the fiercest wave action. This is where you start to see seaweed. Wildlife in the middle tide zone includes: sea anemones, crabs, starfish, snails, impets, barnacles, mussels, sponges, shrimp, chitons, sea urchins and green algae. The Low Tide Zone (or Lower Littoral Zone) is mostly underwater. It gets dry only for a short time during low tide. Wildlife is plentiful in this zone. You can find lots of seaweeds and kelps (1), sea anemones (2), hermit crabs (3), green crabs (4) and other crabs, starfish (5), periwinkle snails (6), limpets (7), barnacles (8), razor clams (9) and other clams , mussels (10), sponges, shrimp (11), chitons (12), sea urchins (13), abalone, small octopuses (14), sea slugs, sea cucumbers and green algae. There are also many fish like the porgy (15), bay blenny (16), and grunion (17). Spray Zone High Tide Zone Middle Tide Zone Low Tide Zone 4 1 3 5 8 9 6 7 10 11 13 12 16 15 14 2 17 Amsel
94-4062 The intertidal zone ecosytem is generally broken down into four areas. The _______________________ Zone (or Supratidal Zone) is above the tide zone. This zone is high up on the beach above where even the high tide reaches. It does get sprayed by big waves and flooded during storms and unusually high tides. Not much wildlife or plant life survives here. It is like a _______________________. You can sometimes find some small barnacles and marine lichen. The _______________________ _______________________ Zone (or Upper Mid-littoral Zone) is underwater only when the tide is high. It is a very salty area. Small pools are left behind when the tide goes out, and they evaporate leaving the salt to collect. You can find sea anemones, crabs, starfish, snails, limpets, barnacles and mussels. The _______________________ ______________________ Zone (or Lower Mid-littoral Zone) spends half its time under water and half its time in the open air. This zone gets the fiercest _______________________ action. This is where you start to see seaweed. Wildlife in the middle tide zone includes: sea anemones, crabs, starfish, snails, impets, barnacles, mussels, sponges, shrimp, chitons, sea urchins and green algae. The __________________ __________________ Zone (or Lower Littoral Zone) is mostly underwater. It gets dry only for a short time during low tide. Wildlife is plentiful in this zone. You can find lots of seaweeds and kelps (1), sea anemones (2), hermit crabs (3), green crabs (4) and other crabs, starfish (5), periwinkle snails (6), limpets (7), barnacles (8), razor clams (9) and other clams, mussels (10), sponges, shrimp (11), chitons (12), sea urchins (13), abalone, small octopuses (14), sea slugs, sea cucumbers and green algae. There are also many fish like the porgy (15), bay blenny (16), and grunion (17). Spray Zone High Tide Zone Middle Tide Zone Low Tide Zone 4 1 3 5 8 9 6 7 10 11 13 12 15 14 2 17 Amsel 16 The Intertidal Zone
Mangrove swamps are found along our tropical and subtropical coastlines. They are rich habitats full of birds like the snowy egret (1), white ibis (2), brown pelican (3), cormorant (4), great blue and yellow crowned night herons (5), bald eagle and red-tailed hawk (6). Alligators (7), crocodiles, sea turtles (8), and dolphins prowl the waterways searching for the fish and invertebrates that hide in the red mangrove’s web of prop roots. Mangrove fish include gar (9), sheepshead (10), bass (11), snappers (12), tarpon, mullet and jacks (13). There are also manatees, sea anemones (14), sponges, snails (15), shrimp (16), blue crabs (17), tree crabs (18), horseshoe crabs (19), anoles (20), and everywhere the air is thick with mosquitoes (21). There are three kinds of mangroves: black, red and white. All can live in salty water. Black mangroves are found in inland swamps and have roots that stick straight out of the water to reach the air. Red mangroves (22) are on the coasts and grow strange, arching prop roots that form a thick web providing shelter for many animals. They are also important for slowing coastal erosion and protecting us from storm surges and tidal waves. Mangroves are threatened by habitat destruction because they were once thought to be wasteland and were cleared for development. Their loss is marked by increased coastal erosion and storm damage and fewer animals. It is now illegal in Florida to cut down a mangrove tree. Mangrove Swamp 4 1 3 5 8 9 6 7 10 11 13 12 19 18 17 16 15 14 22 21 2 20 Amsel
94-4063 Mangrove swamps are found along our tropical and subtropical coastlines. They are rich habitats full of animals. There are three kinds of mangroves: black, red and white and all can live in salty water. __________________ mangroves are found in inland __________________________ and have roots that stick straight out of the water to reach the air. ______________ mangroves are on the coasts and grow strange, arching ___________________ roots that form a thick web providing shelter for many animals. They are also important for slowing coastal ________________________ and protecting us from storm surges and ____________________ waves. Mangroves are threatened by habitat destruction as they were once cleared for development. Their loss is marked by increased coastal erosion, fewer animals, and increased storm damage. It is now illegal in Florida to cut down a mangrove tree. Amsel 4 1 3 5 8 9 6 7 10 11 13 12 19 18 17 16 15 14 22 21 2 20 Mangrove Swamp
Coral Reefs A coral reef is one of the richest habitats on earth with many kinds of plants and animals, giving it great diversity. Yet it needs some specific things to survive. First, the water in which it lives must be salty. It also must be warm, between 68°- 82°F (20 - 27°C). Coral reefs need to be near land because the wave action brings nutrients (food) and oxygen. Waves also keep sand from settling over the animals anchored there. There are three kinds of coral reefs. Fringing reefs run along a shoreline in shallow water, like the reefs around Hawaii or the Caribbean Islands. Barrier reefs run along continents and around islands further off the coast in the ocean. The largest barrier reef in the world is the Great Barrier Reef that runs along the coast of Australia at 1,200 miles (1,932km) long. Atolls form small islands that surround a lagoon of water and are found in the Indo-Pacific Ocean. Some coral reef animals include sea urchins, sponges, sea stars, worms, sea slugs, fish, sharks, dolphins, rays, lobsters, shrimp, octopus, snails, jellyfish, clams, sea turtles, sea anemones and fish. The coral reef gets its many pretty colors from an algae called zooxanthellae that lives in the coral tissue itself, feeding it food and O 2, and taking up CO 2. The coral itself may look like a rock, but it is actually an animal - the most common animal found on a coral reef. It starts as a small floating polyp that attaches to the reef. It stays anchored here its whole life. Coral can’t chase prey, but they have tentacles that sting and capture prey. Their tentacles are also sticky so they can snag food particles that float by. Coral reefs are very sensitive, but there are many ways people can protect them. Never run a boat into coral or anchor on coral. Instead, use a coral reef buoy or anchor in the sand nearby. Never dump trash or dirty water (bilge) near a coral reef. You can snorkel over a reef, but never step on coral because it is a living animal! Don’t drag a hook troll near a coral reef, as hooks can injure coral. In 1998, the U.S. established the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force to better preserve and protect coral reef ecosystems. Amsel
94-4064 Coral ReefS A coral reef is one of the richest habitats on earth with many kinds of plants and animals, giving it great _________________________. Yet it needs some specific things to survive. First, the water in which it lives must be salty. It also must be _________________________, between 68°- 82°F (20 - 27°C). Coral reefs need to be near land because the _________________________ action brings nutrients (food) and _________________________. Waves also keep _________________________ from settling over the animals anchored there. There are three kinds of coral reefs. Fringing reefs run along a shoreline in shallow water, like the reefs around Hawaii or the Caribbean Islands. _________________________ reefs run along continents and around islands further off the coast in the ocean. The largest barrier reef in the world is the Great Barrier Reef that runs along the coast of Australia at 1,200 miles (1,932km) long. Atolls form small _________________________ that surround a lagoon of water and are found in the Indo-Pacific Ocean. The coral reef gets its many pretty colors from an _________________________ called zooxanthellae that lives in the coral tissue itself, feeding it food and O 2, and taking up CO 2. The coral itself may look like a rock but it is actually an animal - the most common animal found found on a coral reef. It starts as a small floating _________________________ that attaches to the reef. It stays anchored here its whole life. Coral can’t chase prey, but they have _________________________ that sting and capture prey. Their tentacles are also sticky so they can snag food particles that float by. Amsel
The Everglades In southern Florida, a four-million-acre sheet of water flows slowly across a grassy plain. This is the Everglades, also called the “river of grass.” The Everglades is home to many water birds like common egrets (1), great blue herons (2), eared grebes (3), moorhens (4) and roseate spoonbills (5). There are birds of prey, like the bald eagle (6), osprey (7) and many hawks and woodpeckers like the sizable pileated woodpecker (8). Water animals, like the Florida manatee (9), American alligator (10) and river otter (11) do well in the wet habitat, as do scavengers like raccoons (12) and opossums (13). The water teems with fish like brown bullhead (14), largemouth bass (15), bluegill (16), sheepshead (17) and spotted sunfish (18), providing food for hungry predators like gar (19) and snapping turtles (20). This wet habitat is also perfect for insects and mosquitoes (21) are plentiful, feeding the many green tree frogs (22), green anoles (23) and other lizards. Even the tiny cotton mouse (24) finds plenty to eat in this rich, diverse habitat. This rich habitat was once thought to be wasted land. Developers began draining it in the 1800s, pulling up mangroves and replacing them with agricultural crops and citrus groves. They built roads, towns and then giant cities, like Miami, all where this massive wetland once flowed. The Everglades dwindled to half its original size. Sewage and other wastes were freely released from developed areas into what was left of the Everglades. Then scientists began to realize that the Everglades was actually filtering and absorbing pollutants from urban areas, like a natural sewage treatment plant. They also noticed that the Everglades absorbed storm surges during hurricanes, decreasing dangerous flooding. People were coming from all over the world to see this unusual habitat and its vast array of wildlife. Awareness of the importance of wetlands specifically the Everglades finally brought an effort to protect what remained of the river of grass. Native plants have been replanted on thousands of acres to form a man-made treatment marsh between the cities and the Everglades. These act to naturally clean harmful nutrients from water flowing into the Everglades and protect them for future generations. 4 1 3 5 8 9 6 7 10 11 12 19 18 17 16 15 13 21 22 24 14 20 2 23 Amsel Amsel
94-4065 4 1 3 5 8 9 6 7 10 11 12 19 18 17 16 15 13 21 22 24 14 20 2 23 Amsel In southern Florida, a four-million-acre sheet of water flows slowly across a grassy plain. This is the Everglades, also called the ____________________ of grass.” The Everglades is home to many __________________ birds like common ____________________ (1), _________________ _________________ _________________ (2), _________________ _________________ (3), ______________________ (4) and _________________ _________________ (5). There are birds of ______________________, like the _________________ _________________ (6), _________________ (7) and many hawks and woodpeckers like the sizable ___________________ ______________________ (8). Water animals, like the ___________________ _________________ (9), ___________________ ___________________ (10) and _________________ _________________ (11) do well in the wet habitat, as do scavengers like ___________________ (12) and ___________________ (13). The water teems with ____________________ like ______________________ _____________________ (14), _________________ _________________ (15), ___________________ (16), _______________________ (17) and ___________________ ___________________ (18), providing food for hungry predators like ___________ (19) and _______________________ _______________________ (20). This wet habitat is also perfect for insects and _______________________ (21) are plentiful, feeding the many ___________________ _____________________ (22), ___________________ ______________________ (23) and other lizards. Even the tiny ______________________ ______________________ (24) finds plenty to eat in this rich, diverse habitat. The Everglades
Marine mammals include whales, dolphins, porpoises, manatees, dugongs, seals, sea lions, fur seals, walruses and otters. Even polar bears are sometimes considered marine mammals because they depend on the ocean for their seal diet. Marine mammals come in all shapes and sizes, from the massive blue whale to the small sea otter. Some, like whales and dolphins, have no body hair. This adaptation helps them move quickly through water. They make up for the lack of warm fur by having blubber to help them stay warm in cold ocean waters. Like all mammals, they breathe air through lungs, are warm-blooded, give birth to live young and feed them on milk. Like mammals on land, marine mammals have a varied diet. Dolphins travel throughout the open ocean eating fish, squid and crabs, while walruses live on rocky arctic coasts eating shellfish, clams and mussels. Leopard seals in Antarctica eat penguins. Manatees are the only vegetarian marine mammal, grazing on plants along warm coastlines. Blue whales, the largest marine mammal (and largest animal on Earth), eat one of the smallest prey tiny shrimp-like krill, filtered from the water through baleen plates instead of teeth. Whales and dolphins are considered some of the most intelligent animals on Earth. Their curiosity, intelligence and grace in the water have fascinated people worldwide. Though they are protected by the 1972 Marine Mammal Act, many marine mammals are endangered from overhunting, pollution and habitat loss. (1) Blue Whale 100 feet long, 300,000 pounds (2) Sperm Whale 60 feet long, 100,000 pounds (3) Humpback Whale 52 feet long, 100,000 pounds (4) Killer Whale 20-30 feet long, 20,000 pounds (5) Narwhal 20 feet long, 2,000 pounds (6) Beluga 14 feet long, 2,000 pounds (7) Manatee 14 feet long, 2,000 pounds (8) Dolphin 12 feet long, 1,400 pounds (9) Walrus 10 feet long, 2,600 pounds (10) Leopard Seal 10 feet long, 1,000 pounds (11) Harbor Seal 6 feet long, 300 pounds (12) Sea Otter 4 feet long, 75-100 pounds 4 1 3 5 8 9 6 7 10 11 12 2 Amsel Marine Mammals
94-4066 Amsel 4 1 3 5 8 9 6 7 10 11 12 2 Marine mammals include whales, dolphins, porpoises, manatees, dugongs, seals, sea lions, fur seals, walruses and otters. Even ____________________ ____________________ are sometimes considered marine mammals because they depend on the ocean for their seal diet. Marine mammals come in all shapes and sizes, from the massive blue whale to the small sea _____________________. Some, like whales and dolphins, have no body ____________________. This adaptation helps them move quickly through water. They make up for the lack of warm fur by having ____________________ to help them stay warm in cold ocean waters. Like all mammals, they breathe air through ____________________, are ____________________-blooded, give birth to live young and feed them on _____________________. Like mammals on land, marine mammals have a varied diet. Dolphins travel throughout the open ocean eating fish, squid and crabs, while walruses live on rocky arctic coasts eating shellfish, clams and mussels. Leopard seals in Antarctica eat penguins. Manatees are the only vegetarian marine mammal, grazing on plants along warm coastlines. _____________________ whales, the largest marine mammal (and largest animal on Earth), eat one of the smallest prey tiny shrimp-like _____________________, filtered from the water through baleen ____________________ instead of teeth. Whales and dolphins are considered some of the most intelligent animals on Earth. Marine Mammals 1 ___________________________ 2 ___________________________ 3 ___________________________ 4 ___________________________ 5 ___________________________ 6 ___________________________ 7 ___________________________ 8 ___________________________ 9 ___________________________ 10 ___________________________ 11 ___________________________ 12 ___________________________
Sharks! Sharks are often called fish, but are actually not in the same group (or Class) as bony fish, like a tuna or trout. They are in a Class called cartilaginous fish (or Chondrichthyes) which includes sting rays and skates. Sharks are very old and have been on Earth for millions of years. They have survived by being well-adapted for their many ocean habitats from the arctic Greenland shark to the many species prowling the tropics. Some, like the blue shark, are built like torpedoes, streamlined to reduce resistance for speed in the water. Some have color patterns that help them blend in while approaching prey. They are darker above and lighter below, like the hammerhead shark. This is a simple but effective camouflage. From above, they blend in with the dark ocean below. From below, they blend in with the lighter surface above. Others have colors and patterns that match their habitat like the sand shark’s speckled skin or the tiger shark’s dappled pattern. Sharks come in all sizes from the massive whale shark at 50 feet long and 40,000 pounds to the dwarf lanternfish a shark just six inches long. Sharks are built for hunting with rows of sharp teeth and powerful jaws, like the great white shark. Some, like the thresher shark, have long tails they use to herd fish together for feeding. Sharks find prey using a keen sense of smell that can detect blood in the water from some distance away. They can also feel the electrical field that all living things give off as we move our muscles. Thrashing prey especially attracts sharks and may explain why they sometimes mistake human swimmers for prey. Sharks eat fish, seals, rays, porpoises and even other sharks. Similar to whales, basking sharks just filter plankton and small fish out of the sea. Shark populations have shrunk to less than a quarter of what they once were because of overfishing. If the U.S. Shark Conservation Act of 2009 passes into law, it will help to save many endangered shark species from extinction. Blue Shark (10 feet long and 450 pounds) Hammerhead Shark (16 feet long and 900 pounds) Tiger Shark (17 feet long and 1,300 pounds) Great White Shark (20 feet long and 4,000 pounds) Greenland Shark (20 feet long and 2,500 pounds) Thresher Shark (20 feet long and 900 pounds) Whale Shark (50 feet long and 40,000 pounds) Amsel
94-4067 Amsel Sharks have survived by being well adapted for their many ocean habitats from the arctic Greenland shark to the many species prowling the tropics. Some, like the blue shark, are built like torpedoes, streamlined to reduce resistance for _____________________ in the water. Some have color patterns that help them blend in while approaching prey. They are darker above and lighter below, like the hammerhead shark. This is a simple but effective _____________________.