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Flip Charts

English Language Arts Grade 3 Flip Chart Set

English Language Arts, Grade 3

 
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Copyright © NewPath Learning. All rights reserved. www.newpathlearning.com Charts Charts \|xiFBGIGy00691mzV 32-3001 Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts Combine Essential ELA Skills with Hands-On Review! Grade Grade 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 C i l t M ® Fli Ch t a r ra ra r ra Gr G Gra a ra a G G Gra ra r ra ra ra G Gr Gr r 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 e 3 3 3 ade a a e 3 3 3 a a ade ade e 3 3 3 a ade ade d 3 3 3 3 e 3 3 e 3 3 e e 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 e 3 e 3 e e 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 de de de de 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Han Curricul Combine with Ha Mastery um Ma L ® e E e Essential EL vie nds-On Revi Flip ip Charts LA Skills LA Skills ew! 3 3 3 3 3 h Ch C C Ch C Ch C Ch h Ch h h C Ch Ch Ch rt art rt a a a a art ha h h har ha h ha ha a ha art rt rt a ha art r h ha ha ha s t ts t ts t ts ts s ts s s t ts ts rts 32-3001 \|xiFBGIGy00691mzV \|xiFBGIGy00691mzV www Copyright © NewPath Learning. .newpathlearning.com www All rights reserved. © Ne ewPath Learning. earning.com hle All rights reserved. .newpathlearning.com Sturdy, Free-Standing Design, Perfect for Learning Centers! Reverse Side Features Questions, Labeling Exercises, Vocabulary Review & more!
ELA Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts provide comprehensive coverage of key standards-based concepts in an illustrated format that is visually appealing, engaging and easy to use. Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts are “write-on/wipe-off” and can be used with the entire classroom, with small groups or by students working independently. This Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart Set features 10 double-sided laminated charts that introduce English Language Arts standards and write-on/wipe off activities for student use or for small group instruction Built-in sturdy free-standing easel for easy display Spiral bound for ease of use Activity Guide with blackline masters of the charts for students to use in centers or independently Ideal for In class instruction for interactive presentations and demonstrations Hands-on student use Teaching resource to supplement any program Learning Centers Stand alone reference for review of key ELA concepts C B A R-Controlled Vowels Synonyms Antonyms Adjectives Fact & Opinion Author’s Purpose Sequential Order Homophones Combining Sentences Vowel Diphthongs Chart # 1: Chart # 2: Chart # 3: Chart # 4: Chart # 5: Chart # 6: Chart # 7: Chart # 8: Chart # 9: Chart #10: HOW TO USE Classroom Use Each ELA Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart can be used for enhancing reading comprehension and language arts instruction. The front page of each Flip Chart provides graphical representation of the topic in a concise, grade appropriate reading level for instructing students. The reverse side of each Flip Chart provides activities for students to practice. Note: Be sure to use an appropriate dry-erase marker and to test it on a small section of the chart prior to using it. The Activity Guide included provides a black-line master of each Flip Chart which students can use to fill in before, during or after instruction. ELA Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts are a great supplement to any ELA program. While the activities in the guide can be used in conjunction with the Flip Charts, they can also be used individually for review or as a form of assessment or in combination with other related classroom activities. Learning Centers Each Flip Chart provides students with a quick illustrated view of grade appropriate language arts concepts. Students may use these Flip Charts in small group settings along with the corresponding activity pages contained in the guide to learn or review concepts already covered in class. Students may also use these charts as reference while playing NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Independent Student Use Students can use the hands-on Flip Charts to practice and learn independently by first studying Side 1 of the chart and then using Side 2 of the chart, or the corresponding graphical activities contained in the guide, to fill in the answers and assess their understanding. Reference/Teaching Resource Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts are a great visual supplement to any curriculum or they can be used in conjunction with NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Phone: 800-507-0966 Fax: 800-507-0967 www.newpathlearning.com NewPath Learning® products are developed by teachers using research-based principles and are classroom tested. The company’s product line consists of an array of proprietary curriculum review games, workbooks, charts, posters, visual learning guides, interactive whiteboard software and other teaching resources. All products are supplemented with web-based activities, assessments and content to provide an engaging means of educating students on key, curriculum-based topics correlated to applicable state and national education standards. Copyright © 2015 NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Curriculum Mastery® and NewPath Learning® are registered trademarks of NewPath Learning LLC. Visit www.newpathlearning.comfor a digital version of this Flip Chart set and other Online Resources.
bird twirl When an r follows a vowel, it shouts over the vowel. So the vowel doesn’t say its name or its short sound. It makes a whole new sound. That is because r is controlling the vowel. When r comes right after the vowel, it affects that vowel. Say these words. Listen to the r-controlled vowel. yard barn germs herd corn sword blurry fur R-Controlled Vowels Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4023
Read each sentence. Underline the words that have r-controlled vowels. Then, write each word you underlined in the correct basket. 1. The turkey ate turnips and yogurt in the flower garden. 2. That skirt does not go with your orange shirt. 3. On Saturday a pretty red cardinal sang in the farmyard. 4. My mother took me to the doctor because the sunburn really hurt. 5. Don’t get dirt on the computer! 6. During the night, the sailor cut the cord, and his raft drifted away. ar er ir or ur Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4023 R-Controlled Vowels
A synonym is a word with the same meaning or a very close meaning to an- other word. You can usually substitute one synonym for the other in a sen- tence, and it will mean the same thing. Why learn synonyms? There are three reasons. 1. Synonyms are important when you are writing so that you don’t use the same word over and over. Using different words will make your writing more interesting. Here’s an example: beautiful = lovely Rico looked out the window and saw that it was a sunny, beautiful day. He decided he wouldn’t spend such a lovely day indoors watching TV. 2. Synonyms can also help you to figure out the meaning of an unknown word in context. Tori had never seen Jack act so immature. In fact, he was being so childish that she was tempted to walk away and not admit they were friends. You may not know the word immature, but you can figure it out because the word childish is used as a synonym in the next sentence. 3. Learning synonyms helps you to increase your vocabulary. The more words you know, the faster and easier it will be for you to read and write. quick = rapid If you live where there is a rapid transit system, you should be able to get anywhere in the city quickly. (Quickly is the adverb form of the word quick.) Synonyms Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4024
Read each sentence. On the line, write a synonym for the underlined word. You may know a synonym for the word. If you don’t, then use a thesaurus to find one. 1. Sitting on a branch of the tree was a hideous bird. __________________ 2. It is against the law to mistreat a pet. __________________ 3. Did you know the right answer? __________________ 4. We went on a journey to China. __________________ 5. They had an awful time on their vacation. __________________ 6. David was afraid of the snake. __________________ 7. In the morning, I licked the moisture from the leaves. ________________ 8. Sydney leaped onto the trampoline. __________________ 9. Please give me your honest opinion. __________________ 10. Our table server was cheerful. __________________ SAM Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4024 Synonyms
An antonym is a word with the opposite meaning to another word. If you substitute an antonym for another word in a sentence, it will change the meaning completely. Why learn antonyms? There are two reasons. Antonym pairs big and little happy and sad few and many up and down 1. Antonyms can help you to figure out the meaning of an unknown word in context. Now Lydia was really scared. She had never seen Ben act so petrified. She was used to Ben being fearless at all times. Yet there he stood, pale and trembling. You may not know the word petrified, but you can figure it out because the word fearless is used as an antonym in the next sentence. The words pale and trembling also help you to understand how he must feel in order to look that way. 2. Learning antonyms helps you to increase your vocabulary. The more words you know, the faster and easier it will be for you to read and write. It is also useful when making comparisons. For example, enormous and tiny are antonyms. Read this sentence to see how the writer made a comparison so you could form a picture in your mind. Standing so close to the enormous grizzly bear made Sarah look tiny. Antonyms Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4025
Write an antonym for each word given. Then, use the pair of words in a sentence. The first one is done for you. light is the opposite of _____________ ______________________________________________________ 1. angry is the opposite of _______________ _____________________________________________________ 2. good is the opposite of _______________ _____________________________________________________ 3. crying is the opposite of _______________ _____________________________________________________ 4. far is the opposite of _______________ _____________________________________________________ 5. smiling is the opposite of _______________ _____________________________________________________ 6. dead is the opposite of _______________ _____________________________________________________ 7. sunrise is the opposite of _______________ _____________________________________________________ dark She turned the light on so it would not be dark. Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4025 Antonyms
A noun is a person, place or thing. An adjective is a word that tells more about a noun. It describes a noun. Adding adjectives to your writing makes it more vivid and interesting. When you read, it is important that you form pictures in your mind based on the words in the story. Adjectives are what help you to form the pictures. Comparing with Adjectives Some adjectives compare nouns. There are two ways that these adjectives are formed. When you compare 2 things, you use the word more or less, or you add –er to the end of the adjective. When you compare 3 or more things, you use the word most or least, or you add –est to the end of the adjective. Compare these sentences: The boy sat. Can you picture that? Not really. There’s not enough detail. The boy sat on the musty old couch. The words musty and old are adjectives. You wrinkle your nose as you picture him sitting on that yucky couch. Jazz is more popular than rock ‘n roll. Randy is shorter than Nicole. Buy the vase that is the least expensive. This is the biggest tree in my neighborhood. Adjectives Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4026
TOYS AD1B5 76 Circle the adjective(s) in each sentence. On the line, write which noun(s) the adjective(s) describe(s). The mean usher grabbed my ticket and threw it in the trash. _________ 1. An ugly troll jumped out and shook his tiny fist at Jenna. ______________________________ 2. Which store is the closest to us? ______________________________ 3. Sheila rubbed her sore elbow and then wiped her teary eyes. ______________________________ 4. We watched the muddy brown water race under the bridge. ______________________________ 5. Check out Dave’s fancy new car! ______________________________ 6. These gloves are more attractive than that pair. ______________________________ 7. I’ve misplaced my brown sunglasses. ______________________________ 8. The dog’s fur was dirty and matted. ______________________________ usher Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4026 Adjectives
A fact is a statement that can be proven. You can find it published, often in more than one place. An opinion is a statement that shows the point of view that someone has about a topic. An opinion is a judgment. The writer wants to convince the reader to agree. Advertising is a Mix of Fact and Opinion Some of the sentences in an ad are facts. Some are opinions. The opinions try to convince you to buy the product or service. Fact: Are You Smarter than Your Parents? is a new TV game show that airs on Tuesday nights. If you doubt a fact, you can look for evidence to prove it. You can check the TV listings to find that this show airs on Tuesday in the evening. You can go online to find out that the show is in its first season and thus new. Opinion: Are You Smarter than Your Parents? is the best new TV game show of the season. There is no way to prove that it is the best new TV game show. Some people may dislike it; they would not agree that it’s even good. A set of 500 blocks is just $59.99. Hurry–at this price, supplies won’t last! Fact Opinion Castle Stone Building Bricks The toy your child wants the most! These sturdy plastic bricks look like they’re made of stone. They snap together easily to build castles, forts, and stone walls. Your child will be delighted! Improve your child’s imagination and give him or her hours of fun with Castle Stone Building Bricks! Fact and Opinion Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4027
1. __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ 2. __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ 3. __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ 4. __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ 1. _________________________ _________________________ _________________________ 2. _________________________ _________________________ _________________________ This ad states 4 facts. It states 2 opinions. Can you spot them? Complete the T chart using the sentences in the advertisement. FACTS OPINIONS Exploding Pumpkins is the video game from VidsKid that you’ve been waiting for! Throw sticks of dynamite at pumpkins and watch them blow up! Import pictures of friends and family and have the pumpkins explode above their heads! Rated “Best New Game” in the Nonviolent Category last month by Gamers International. Exploding Pumpkins is the most exciting video game you can play. Get in on the fun today! Download Exploding Pumpkins for just $19.97! Fact and Opinion Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4027
1 + - - + 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 The author’s purpose is the reason that he or she has for writing the text. An author writes something for one of three purposes: to inform, to entertain, or to persuade. Inform When an author writes to inform, the purpose is for the reader to learn something from the text. Nonfiction is almost always informative writing. This includes newspaper and magazine articles. Here’s an example: Yale University had a cockroach problem in its library. The roaches were eating the old books' covers and binding glue. These books could never be replaced. So the library was closed for four days during the winter. The heat was shut off. The cockroaches froze to death. Entertain When an author writes to entertain, the purpose is for the reader to enjoy the text. Poetry, humor, and all genres of fiction are examples of entertainment writing. Here’s an example: My little brother is really into action movies. His favorite actor is Arnold Schwarzenegger. Last night I was looking at the choices on MovieNet. My little brother came into the room. He grabbed the remote. He said that he wanted to find a movie starring “Arnold Snorts-in-Anger!” That made me laugh so hard I couldn’t even get mad at him. Persuade When an author writes to persuade, the purpose is to convince the reader to agree with the author’s point of view. Advertisements, editorials, and speeches are all persuasive writing. Here’s an example: It is a bad idea to have a curfew for teens under 17 in our town. A curfew says that adults don’t trust kids to do the right thing. Studies show that teens rise to our expectations. So we are setting the bar very low when we say that they can’t even decide when to be home. We would never put a curfew on adults. So why do it to teens? Author’s Purpose Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4028
Circle the word that describes the author’s purpose for writing each paragraph. Author’s Purpose Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4028 1. Our bake sale will be held on May 5 during school hours. We need volunteers to bake cookies, cakes, pies, and snack bars. We also need volunteers to set up and tear down the display. Please tear off the response section at the bottom of this sheet to participate. Thanks for your help! inform entertain persuade 2. You have to taste them to believe it! Stevalite Sweets are actually good for you. They come in delicious flavors like caramel, blue raspberry, lemon, cherry, and pineapple. They’re made with stevia, an all-natural, zero-calorie sweetener. So they won’t give you cavities. You’ll fall in love with Stevalite Sweets! inform entertain persuade 3. Julia knew that large rocks lay at that edge of the field. They were mostly covered by snow. Their snowmobile was heading right for them! Donald had no idea they existed. Julia tried screaming to him. The wind whipped her words away. She held onto Donald’s waist with one arm and pounded his shoulder with the other. inform entertain persuade 4. This math question has two parts: I and II. Part I is a multiple choice question. You must choose a single answer that best describes the graph. Part II is a word problem based on the graph. You must enter your answer, including the label, in the box provided. inform entertain persuade 20 40 60 80 100 Sports Teams Team members 0 FootballSoccer Track Basketball Lacrosse
Sequential order is the order in which things occur. It is the sequence of events. Authors include words to help you understand the sequence. Some of these words include: first, second, next, then, last, before, after that, finally, back then, today, and now. Knowing how to use sequence words helps you to write a summary. The story below is a summary of a whole vacation. It sums up the major events without telling you every single detail. Notice how the author used sequence words to guide the reader: The first thing we did on our trip was get in a plane. We flew to Tampa Beach. Then we checked into our hotel. We spent the next three days playing on the beach. We built sandcastles and played in the water. It was so clear that we could see fish in the water with us. The weather was sunny and warm. We didn’t want to leave. Finally, we flew home. We’d had a great trip! Here’s what happened on their trip in sequential order: First, they flew in a plane to Tampa Beach. Then, they checked into their hotel. Next, they spent three days playing on the beach. Finally, they flew home again. Sequential Order Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4029
Write a summary of the following passage. Use at least four sequence words to help your reader. John Lea and William Perris opened a store in Worcester, England in 1823. They mixed chemicals to give to people who felt ill. They also made any mixture a customer asked for. In 1836, Arthur Sandys asked the men to make a sauce. He had tasted it in India and had the recipe. John and William followed the recipe exactly. It used anchovies. They are tiny fish. The men poured the sauce into two barrels. One barrel was for Arthur. The other was theirs. The pair tasted the sauce. They thought it was awful. They told Arthur they had failed. The men left their barrel in the basement. A year later they opened it. They tasted it again, and it was great! What had happened? The sauce had fermented. That means that the sugar in it had turned to alcohol. Yeast and bacteria cause things to ferment. This process had made the sauce delicious. John and William named it Worcestershire sauce. They grew rich selling it. Today it is popular around the world. First, Sequential Order Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4029
Homophones are words that are sound the same but are spelled differently. They also have different meanings. This makes them some of the most commonly misspelled words. The best way to figure out which homophone to use is to substitute another word that means the same thing. The computer has several problems, but the principal (main) one is damaged circuits. There are ten principles (rules) that apply to all forms of art. A school principal is your “pal.” Our principal (pal) is Mr. Adamson. to (toward) too (also) two (2) your (you own it) you’re (you are) sale (bargain) sail (huge canvas sheet on a boat) pair (two of a kind) pare (peel) pear (fruit) cent (penny) scent (odor) sent (past tense of send) principal (head of the school) principal (main) principle (rule) Homophones Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4030
Circle the correct homophone to complete the sentence. 1. This bat is on _____________. sale OR sail 2. The teacher told Alan to go to see the _____________. principle OR principal 3. I love the _____________ of roses! cent OR scent OR sent 4. There was a _____________ on the shelf. pair OR pare OR pear 5. _____________ going to the ballgame at 2 p.m. today. You’re OR Your 6. The ship set _____________ yesterday. sale OR sail 7. Gina needs a new _____________ of shoes for track. pair OR pare OR pear 8. We’re going to Florida that week, _____________. to OR too OR two 9. Corn is the _____________ grain grown in the area. principle OR principal Homophones Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4030
When you write, you don’t want to use too many short sentences. It will make your writing choppy. You can join ideas using conjunctions. The three most common conjunctions are: and, but, or. and (used to join similar ideas) Choppy : Dave is going to the restaurant. Sandra is going to the restaurant. Better : Dave and Sandra are going to the restaurant. Since both people are going to the restaurant, it makes sense to say so in one sentence using and. but (used to join opposite ideas) Choppy : I like reading. I don’t like math. Better : I like reading, but I don’t like math. This is a clear case of opposite ideas: liking one thing and not the other. Use but to join opposites. or (used to join alternatives or show uncertainty) Choppy : Robin has to choose. She can go to the park on Sunday. She can go to the picnic. She can go to the beach. Better : Robin has to choose whether to go to the park or the picnic or the beach on Sunday. Robin can’t go everywhere on Sunday. She has three alternatives. Use or to show her choices. Choppy : James is coming to my party. Maria is coming to my party. Better : James and Maria are coming to my party. THINK! How would the meaning change if the names were joined with or? Combining Sentences Visit www.newpathlearning.com for Online Learning Resources. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 92-4031
Join the choppy sentences to make one better sentence. Use a conjunction in each sentence. If there is a sentence on both sides of the conjunction, add a comma in front of the conjunction. Choppy : Terri is going on the field trip. Mason can’t go. Better : Terri is going on the field trip, but Mason can’t go. 1. Choppy : Each day Pedro eats a banana. He eats an orange. He eats walnuts, too. Better : _____________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ 2. Choppy : That sound may be a jet taking off. It may be a jet landing. Better : _____________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ 3. Choppy : Mom wants to go out to dinner. Dad doesn’t feel well. Better : _____________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ 4. Choppy : The author wrote a popular book. She made it into a screenplay. Better : _____________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ 5. Choppy : The