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Flip Charts

Math Grade 5

Mathematics, Grade 5

 
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Copyright © NewPath Learning. All rights reserved. www.newpathlearning.com Charts Charts Grade Grade Curriculum Mastery Flip Charts Combine Essential Math Skills with Hands-On Review! ® 33-5001 555 \|xiBAHBDy01218kzU Sturdy, Free-Standing Design, Perfect for Learning Centers! Reverse Side Features Questions, Math Problems, Vocabulary Review & more!
Phone: 800-507-0966 Fax: 800-507-0967 www.newpathlearning.com NewPath Learning® products are developed by teachers using research-based principles and are classroom tested. The company’s product line consists of an array of proprietary curriculum review games, workbooks, posters and other print materials. All products are supplemented with web-based activities, assessments and content to provide an engaging means of educating students on key, curriculum-based topics correlated to applicable state and national education standards. Copyright © 2009 NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Curriculum Mastery® and NewPath Learning® are registered trademarks of NewPath Learning LLC. Math Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts provide comprehensive coverage of key standards-based curriculum in an illustrated format that is visually appealing, engaging and easy to use. Curriculum Mastery® Flip Charts can be used with the entire classroom, with small groups or by students working independently. Each Math Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart Set features 10 double-sided laminated charts covering grade-level specific curriculum content on one side plus write-on/wipe-off charts on reverse side for student use or for small-group instruction. Built-in sturdy free-standing easel for easy display Spiral bound for ease of use Activity Guide with black-line masters of the charts for students to fill-in, key vocabulary terms, corresponding quiz questions for each chart, along with answers Ideal for Learning centers In class instruction for interactive presentations and demonstrations Hands-on student use Stand alone reference for review of key science concepts Teaching resource to supplement any program HOW TO USE Classroom Use Each Curriculum Mastery® Flip Chart can be used to graphically introduce or review a topic of interest. Side 1 of each Flip Chart provides graphical representation of key concepts in a concise, grade appropriate reading level for instructing students. The reverse Side 2 of each Flip Chart allows teachers or students to fill in the answers and summarize key concepts. Note: Be sure to use an appropriate dry-erase marker and to test it on a small section of the chart prior to using it. The Activity Guide included provides a black-line master of each Flip Chart which students can use to fill in before, during, or after instruction. On the reverse side of each black-line master are questions corresponding to each Flip Chart topic which can be used as further review or as a means of assessment. While the activities in the guide can be used in conjunction with the Flip Charts, they can also be used individually for review or as a form of assessment or in conjunction with any other related assignment. Learning Centers Each Flip Chart provides students with a quick illustrated view of grade-appropriate curriculum concepts. Students may use these Flip Charts in small group settings along with the corresponding activity pages contained in the guide to learn or review concepts already covered in class. Students may also use these charts as reference while playing the NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Independent student use Students can use the hands-on Flip Charts to practice and learn independently by first studying Side 1 of the chart and then using Side 2 of the chart or the corresponding graphical activities contained in the guide to fill in the answers and assess their understanding. Reference/Teaching resource Curriculum Mastery® Charts are a great visual supplement to any curriculum or they can be used in conjunction with NewPath’s Curriculum Mastery® Games. Chart # 1: Chart # 2: Chart # 3: Chart # 4: Chart # 5: Chart # 6: Chart # 7: Chart # 8: Chart # 9: Chart #10: Collecting & Displaying Data Multiplying & Dividing Decimals Measurement: Time & Temperature Multiplying & Dividing Fractions Ratio, Proportion & Percent Operations with Mixed Numbers Introduction to Algebra Probability Concepts Congruence, Transformations & Symmetry Lines, Angles & Circles
Tables Collecting data You can collect data (information) from other people using polls and surveys. Scientists collect data from experiments. Tables and graphs help us organize and interpret collected information. The mean is the average of a set of numbers. To find the mean, add all the numbers in the set and divide the sum by the number of items in the set. The median is the middle number when the data are in numerical order. The mode is the number that occurs most often in a set of data. Bike Color No. of Gears Price Ranger Outdoor Tourist Starburst Mountain Silver 5 10 $240 $295 $325 12 $375 $225 15 6 Blue Red Black White Types of Bikes Sold at the Bike Shop Mean Median Mode 20 ÷ 5 = 4 The mean is 4 The median is 6 The mode is 5 2, 3, 3, 6, 8, 10, 12 3, 5, 5, 5, 6, 6, 8, 9 middle number Frequency Table A frequency table shows the totals of the tally marks. A bar graph is one way of showing data that can be counted. Each segment in a circle graph represents a fraction of a set of data. A line graph presents a set of data collected over time using line segments. Months Months Number of bikes sold Number of Bikes A stem-and-leaf plot shows data arranged by place value. 3 + 5 + 2 + 6 + 4 Line Graph Circle Graph Bar Graph Stem–and–Leaf Plot Ranger Bike Tally Total Outdoor Tourist Starburst Mountain RangerOutdoorT ourist Starburst Mountain 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Total 20 10 2 1 4 3 10 20 30 40 50 60 10 20 30 40 50 60 January F ebruaryM ar ch M ay A pril June July A ugust 15, 20, 28, 31, 35, 46, 49, 52 (arranged from least to greatest) Stem (tens digit) Leaf (ones digit) Mountain (10 bikes) 5 08 15 69 2 1 2 3 4 5 Outdoor (4 bikes) Ranger (3 bikes) Starburst Tourist(1 bike) To find the number of gears of the Starburst bike, look across the Starburst row until it meets the Gear column. The headings tell us what data is in each column. The title tells us what the table is about. Height of the bars shows how many of each bike sold (2 bikes) © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 93-4501 www.newpathlearning.com Collecting & Displaying Data
\|xiBAHBDy01641qzZ Tables The is the average of a set of numbers. To find the mean, add all the numbers in the set and divide the sum by the number of items in the set. The median is the when the data are in numerical order. The mode is the number that occurs in a set of data. Bike Color No. of Gears Price Ranger Outdoor Tourist Starburst Mountain Silver 5 10 $240 $295 $325 12 $375 $225 15 6 Blue Red Black White Types of Bikes Sold at the Bike Shop Mean Median Mode ÷ = The mean is 4 The median is 6 The mode is 5 2, 3, 3, 6, 8, 10, 12 3, 5, 5, 5, 6, 6, 8, 9 middle number Frequency Table A frequency table shows the totals of the tally marks. A bar graph is one way of showing data that can be counted. Each segment in a circle graph represents a fraction of a set of data. A line graph presents a set of data collected over time using line segments. Months Number of bikes sold Number of Bikes A stem-and-leaf plot shows data arranged by place value. 3 + 5 + 2 + 6 + 4 Key Vocabulary Terms bar graph circle graph column data frequency table graph heading line graph mean median mode poll stem-and-leaf plot survey table title Line Graph Circle Graph Bar Graph Stem–and–Leaf Plot Ranger Bike Tally Total Outdoor Tourist Starburst Mountain RangerOutdoorT ourist Starburst Mountain 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Total 10 20 30 40 50 60 January F ebruaryM ar ch M ay A pril June July A ugust 15, 20, 28, 31, 35, 46, 49, 52 (arranged from least to greatest) Stem (tens digit) Leaf (ones digit) To find the number of gears of the Starburst bike, look across the Starburst row until it meets the Gear column. The headings tell us what data is in each column. The tells us what the table is about. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 93-4501 www.newpathlearning.com Collecting & Displaying Data
Therefore, 3 ÷ 0.2 = 15 Therefore, 0.6 x 0.3 = 0.18 or Therefore, 0.59 x 4.8 = 2.832 m = 32.22 n = 6.75 18 100 Multiplying Whole Numbers by Decimals Using Grids to Multiply Multiplying Decimals by Decimals Dividing Decimals by Whole Numbers Dividing a Decimal by a Decimal Multiply as you would with whole numbers. How many 2 tenths are there in 3 wholes? There are 15 sets of 2 tenths. Add the number of decimal places in each factor. Place the decimal point in the product. The 18 overlapping squares (green) that are shaded twice show the product of 0.6 x 0.3. Multiply as you would with whole numbers. Add the number of decimal places in each factor. Place the decimal point in the product. Shade 0.6 of the grid. Shade 0.3 of the grid with a different color or pattern in the other direction. Change the divisor and the dividend to a whole number by multiplying each by the same power of 10. Divide as you would divide whole numbers. Add zeros as needed. Place the decimal point in the quotient directly above the decimal point in the dividend. Bring down the ones and divide. Step 2 The answer checks if the product is the same as the dividend Multiply: 6 x 5.37 = m Multiply: 0.6 x 0.3 = n Divide: 3 ÷ 0.2 = p Divide: 5.4 ÷ 0.8 = n multiply: 1 x 6 subtract: 8 6 compare: 2 < 4 5.37 x 6 32.22 2 decimal places 0 decimal places move decimal point 2 places + 2 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 0.5 9 4.8 4 7 2 2 3 6 0 2 8 3 2 2 decimal places 1 decimal places move decimal point 3 places + 3 2 1 7 3 x . = 5.4 0.8 54 8 x10 x10 x10 x10 54.00 6.75 6 0 5 6 40 40 0 48 08. 5.4 0.8 54. 8. © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 93-4502 www.newpathlearning.com Multiplying & Dividing Decimals
\|xiBAHBDy01654qzZ Therefore, 3 ÷ 0.2 = 15 Therefore, 0.6 x 0.3 = 0.18 or Therefore 0.59 x 4.8 = 2.832 m = 32.22 n = 6.75 18 100 Multiplying Whole Numbers by Decimals Using Grids to Multiply Dividing Decimals by Whole Numbers Multiply as you would with whole numbers. How many 2 tenths are there in 3 wholes? There are 15 sets of 2 tenths. Add the number of decimal places in each factor. Place the decimal point in the product. The 18 overlapping squares (green) that are shaded twice show the product of 0.6 x 0.3. Multiply as you would with whole numbers. Add the number of decimal places in each factor. Place the decimal point in the product. Shade 0.6 of the grid. Shade 0.3 of the grid with a different color or pattern in the other direction. Change the divisor and the dividend to a whole number by multiplying each by the same power of 10. Divide as you would divide whole numbers. Add zeros as needed. Place the decimal point in the quotient directly above the decimal point in the dividend. Multiply: 6 x 5.37 = m Multiply: 0.6 x 0.3 = n Divide: 3 ÷ 0.2 = p Divide: 5.4 ÷ 0.8 = n 5.37 x 6 2 decimal places 0 decimal places move decimal point 2 places + 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 0.5 9 4.8 + 7 3 x = 5.4 0.8 54.00 08. 5.4 0.8 54. 8. Key Vocabulary Terms decimal decimal place decimal point divide dividend divisor multiply power of 10 product quotient tenth whole number 2 decimal places 0 decimal places move decimal point 2 places Multiplying Decimals by Decimals Dividing a Decimal by a Decimal © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 93-4502 www.newpathlearning.com Multiplying & Dividing Decimals
Fahrenheit ( ºF ) Celsius ( ºC ) Measurement: Time & Temperature © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 93-4503 www.newpathlearning.com Number Line 8:00 a.m. 9:00 a.m. 10:00 a.m. 11:00 a.m. 12:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m. 1 hr 1 hr 45min Temperature Units of Time clock calendar digital clock Early American Timeline 60 seconds (s) 1 year 1 regular year 1 leap year 1 century 60 minutes 24 hours 52 weeks 365 days 366 days 100 years 12 months (mo) 7 days OCTOBER 1 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 2 3 30 31 29 28 27 26 25 12 6 9 3 1 11 2 10 4 5 7 8 pm 1607 First colony formed at Jamestown, VA 1706 Benjamin Franklin is born 1732 George Washington is born 1773 Boston Tea Party 1776 Declaration of Independence 1 minute (min) 1 hour (hr) 1 day (d) 1 week (wk) Elapsed time is the difference between the Start and the End times. In the customary system of measurement, temperature is read in degrees Fahrenheit ( ºF ). Change in temperature ( ºF ) Change in temperature ( ºC ) In the metric system of measurement, temperature is read in degrees Celsius ( ºC ). Add to find the End Time. Count up to find Elapsed Time on a number line. Subtract to find the Start Time. 1 year (yr) Elapsed Time End Time Start Time 8 hr 36 min 10 hr 24 min 9 hr 84 min 1 hr 48 min 10:24 a.m. 8:36 a.m. Elapsed Time (?) 3hr 46 min 8:28 a.m. End Time (?) 2:43 p.m. Start Time (?) 3 hr 46 min 8 hr 28 min 11 hr 74 min 12 hr 14 min + = 1 hr 12 min 2 hr 43 min 1 hr 31 min Rename 1 hr as 60 min. Rename 74 min as 1 hr 14 min = End Time + = = = 12 : 14 p.m. Start Time = 1 : 31 p.m. 1 hr 12 min start time 11:45a.m. 9:00a.m. Elapsed Time (?) Elapsed Time = 1 hr + 1 hr + 45 min = 2 hr 45 min 47 ºF to 69ºF = 22ºF 32 ºC to 56 ºC = 24 ºC 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 ºF 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 ºF ºC 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 ºC
© Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 93-4503 www.newpathlearning.com \|xiBAHBDy01651pzY Fahrenheit ( ºF ) Celsius ( ºC ) Measurement: Time & Temperature Number Line 8:00 a.m. 9:00 a.m. 10:00 a.m. 11:00 a.m. 12:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m. Temperature Units of Time clock digital clock Early American Timeline 60 seconds (s) 60 minutes 24 hours 52 weeks 365 days 366 days 100 years 12 months (mo) 7 days 12 6 9 3 1 11 2 10 4 5 7 8 pm 1607 First colony formed at Jamestown, VA 1706 Benjamin Franklin is born 1732 George Washington is born 1773 Boston Tea Party 1776 Declaration of Independence 1 minute (min) Elapsed time is the difference between the and the . In the customary system of measurement, temperature is read in degrees Fahrenheit ( ºF ). Change in temperature ( ºF ) Change in temperature ( ºC ) In the metric system of measurement, temperature is read in degrees Celsius ( ºC ). Add to find the End Time. Count up to find Elapsed Time on a number line. Subtract to find the Start Time. Elapsed Time End Time Start Time 8 hr 36 min 10 hr 24 min 10:24 a.m. 8:36 a.m. Elapsed Time (?) 3hr 46 min 8:28 a.m. End Time (?) 2:43 p.m. Start Time (?) 3 hr 46 min 8 hr 28 min + 1 hr 12 min 2 hr 43 min = End Time + = = = Start Time = 1 hr 12 min start time 11:45a.m. 9:00a.m. Elapsed Time (?) Elapsed Time = 1 hr + 1 hr + 45 min = 2 hr 45 min 47 ºF to 69ºF = 22 ºF 32ºC to 56ºC = 24 ºC 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 ºF 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 ºF ºC 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 ºC Key Vocabulary Terms Celsius elapsed time end time Fahrenheit number line start time
Modeling Multiplication Multiplying Fractions Modeling Division Dividing Fractions 2 3 3 4 = = 1 2 6 12 ÷6 ÷6 ÷6 ÷6 6 12 x 2 3 2 3 3 4 3 4 x x x = = Multiply 2 3 3 4 x Multiply 3 16 9 16 ÷ Divide 2 3 6 ÷ Divide Shade of the rectangle. Divide rectangle into thirds. Shade of the rectangle with a different color or pattern in the other direction. Step 1 3 4 Therefore, X = or 3 4 The answer of is in simplest form. 1 2 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 3 4 2 3 The overlapping sections (green) that are shaded twice show the product of x . There are 3 groups of in . Multiply the numerators. How many sets of are there in ? Step 2 Multiply the denominators. Step 3 Use the greatest common factor (GCF) to simplify the product, if necessary. The GCF of 6 & 12 is 6. 2 3 6 1 2 3 ÷ ÷ 6 1 3 2 x = Step 1 Write the whole number as a fraction. Step Dividend Divisor 2 Flip the divisor upside down to find the reciprocal. The reciprocal of is . Rewrite as multiplication using the reciprocal. Simplify before multiplying. Step 4 Step 3 6 12 3 16 3 16 3 16 3 16 9 16 9 16 3 16 9 16 6 12 1 2 Therefore, ÷ = 9 16 3 3 9 16 6 3 1 9 1 3 1 x = = 3 3 1 2 © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 93-4504 www.newpathlearning.com Multiplying & Dividing Fractions
Modeling Multiplication Multiplying Fractions Modeling Division Dividing Fractions 2 3 3 4 = = 6 12 x 2 3 3 4 x x x = = Multiply 2 3 3 4 x Multiply 3 16 9 16 ÷ Divide 2 3 6 ÷ Divide Shade of the rectangle. Divide rectangle into thirds. Shade of the rectangle with a different color or pattern in the other direction. Step 1 3 4 Therefore, X = or 3 4 The answer of is in simplest form. 1 2 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 3 4 2 3 The overlapping sections (green) that are shaded twice show the product of x . There are 3 groups of in . Multiply the numerators. How many sets of are there in ? Step 2 Multiply the denominators. Step 3 Use the greatest common factor (GCF) to simplify the product, if necessary. The GCF of 6 & 12 is 6. 2 3 ÷ ÷ x = Step 1 Write the whole number as a fraction. Step Dividend Divisor 2 Flip the divisor upside down to find the reciprocal. The reciprocal of is . Rewrite as multiplication using the reciprocal. Simplify before multiplying. Step 4 Step 3 3 16 9 16 9 16 3 16 9 16 Therefore, ÷ = 9 16 3 3 16 6 x = = Key Vocabulary Terms denominator divide divisor fraction greatest common factor (GCF) multiply numerator product reciprocal whole number © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 93-4504 www.newpathlearning.com Multiplying & Dividing Fractions \|xiBAHBDy01655nzW
Identity (zero) Property Commutative Property of Addition 10 100 1 10 = = = = Ratio Fraction form Word form Using a colon boys to girls girls to the total number of students boys to the total number of students 5:7 5 to 7 7 to 12 5 to 12 7:12 5:12 10% 25 100 1 4 5 7 7 12 5 12 = = = = 25% 50 100 1 2 = = = = 50% 75 100 3 4 = = = = 75% 100 100 10 10 = = = = 100% 80 100 20 20 4 5 = = = xx = 1 5 1 5 1 5 1 5 Step 5 7 1 Equal Ratios: Count the number of boys: Count the number of girls: Write a ratio to compare. Ratios can be written in three different ways. Step 2 4 1 4 1 = = 12 3 12 3 8 2 8 2 4 1 4 1 4 4 4 4 11 ÷ = = 12 3 12 3 12 12 4 4 3 3 ÷ = = 8 2 8 2 8 8 4 4 2 2 ÷ = = Proportion Ratio Percent What percent of this grid is shaded? Lemonade Making Directions Percents show up everywhere in our daily lives sales tax on purchases, tips at restaurants, discounts at stores, among others. Percent means “per hundred”. It is a ratio that compares a number to 100. For example, 36 percent is a ratio of 36 to 100 or 36 out of 100. A proportion is an equation showing that two ratios are equal. Ratios that are equal to each other are called equivalent fractions. A ratio is a comparison of two numbers. These numbers are called the terms of the ratio. Write a ratio to compare the number of girls and boys in your classroom. = boy = girl = water = lemon juice Mix 4 parts water with 1 part lemon juice. change to an equivalent fraction with a denominator of 100. 80% 4 5 © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 93-4505 www.newpathlearning.com Ratio, Proportion & Percents
1 10 = = = = Ratio Fraction form Word form Using a colon boys to girls girls to the total number of students boys to the total number of students 1 4 = = = = 1 2 = = = = 3 4 = = = = 100 100 10 10 = = = = 4 5 = = = xx = 1 5 1 5 1 5 1 5 Step 1 Equal Ratios: Count the number of boys: Count the number of girls: Write a ratio to compare. Ratios can be written in three different ways. Step 2 4 1 = = ÷ = = 5 to 7 : : : 5 to 7 5 to 7 ÷ = = ÷ = = Key Vocabulary Terms denominator equal ratio equivalent fraction fraction percent proportion ratio Proportion Ratio Percent What percent of this grid is shaded? Lemonade Making Directions Percents show up everywhere in our daily lives sales tax on purchases, tips at restaurants, discounts at stores, among others. Percent means “per hundred”. It is a ratio that compares a number to 100. For example, 36 percent is a ratio of 36 to 100 or 36 out of 100. A is an equation showing that two ratios are equal. Ratios that are equal to each other are called . A ratio is a comparison of two numbers. These numbers are called the terms of the ratio. Write a ratio to compare the number of girls and boys in your classroom. = boy = girl = water = lemon juice Mix 4 parts water with 1 part lemon juice. change to an equivalent fraction with a denominator of 100. % 4 5 % % % % % © Copyright NewPath Learning. All Rights Reserved. 93-4505 www.newpathlearning.com Ratio, Proportion & Percents \|xiBAHBDy01662lz[
Addition Subtraction Multiplication Division + + Add Step 1 2 3 2 1 6 3 Multiply 1 4 2 1 4 2 9 4 2 3 Subtract 3 4 4 5 8 2 Find the least common denominator (LCD) of and . 2 3 1 6 Step 1 Find the LCD and write equivalent fractions. LCD of and is 8. Step 2 Subtract the fractions first, then the whole numbers. Simplify the difference, if necessary. 3 4 5 8 Step 2 Write equivalent fractions with a denominator of 6. Step 1 Write the mixed number as an improper fraction. Step 1 Write the mixed number as improper fractions. Step 2 Rewrite as multiplication using the reciprocal of the divisor. Step 3 Multiply the numerators and denominators and simplify. Step 4 Write as a mixed number. Step 2 Multiply the numerators and